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usability Archives - Syneka Marketing

The co-dependence between Marketing and IT

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | 2 Comments

Marketing and Information Technology are often seen as disparate functions with little overlap. In reality, however, both are required for any organisation or business to operate successfully. As a result there is an increasing co-dependence between both of these areas.

Marketing requires valid information so you can make the right assumptions and create strategies that deliver positive results. IT, through websites, customer relationship management (CRM) systems and point of sale data collection, provides the ability to capture data and to analyse this information to deliver insights.

As an example, websites have traditionally been seen as an IT exercise, with little consideration of usability and end user interaction. Undertaking this approach, means that your website will not take into consideration the needs of your target customers and will diminish the ability to achieve sales or inquiries.

A marketing approach, utilities available technology to deliver outcomes that support the goals and direction of your business. Through a marketing approach, a website would be developed from understanding the needs it would fulfill, including an an assessment of your target customers and how they interact with your business. The website appearance and functionality would support this interaction, so that it can guide visitors to achieve the goals you have for your site. Furthermore, a marketing approach would ensure that your website adapts the existing style and identity you have for your business, to ensure a consistent appearance and level of interaction.

Similarly, CRM systems help maintain contact with customers and store relevant information about them, your products and transaction history. While the storage of information is an IT exercise, marketing involves the use of this information to deliver insights that will achieve your business objectives. A marketing perspective would utilize this data to identify customers that require more frequent contact, or may be suitable for additional purchases.

If you do not have a CRM, then you would have the challenge of collating information and storing data in a centralized location. This results in inefficiency and makes it harder to analyse data to gain insights, such as frequency, variations between customers and even basic contact details.

For many businesses, marketing and information technology is not a core focus. Investing in marketing and information technology enables you to scale your business and to build capacity to facilitate growth.

The collaboration between marketing and information technology is only going to increase into the future. It is important to have the right systems in place to support your marketing initiatives.

Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector – Day Two

By | Advice, Government, Presentations, Resources | No Comments
Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

Today is the second day of the GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector conference. Yesterday I chaired the proceedings and delivered a presentation on the use of social media for advocacy campaigns.

Today’s sessions looked at the day-to-day usage of social media, through government programs and in emergency management. Insights included the New Zealand earthquake where social media was used to disseminate information and provide updates on the recovery efforts. The presentation also discussed the importance of keeping backup information, particularly when electricity and computer networks are unavailable.

My presentation looked at the various social media tools and how they can be utilized to assist the public sector in being able to engage the community. I looked at the most prominent tools, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and discussed their strengths and potential usability for the public sector. Like most technologies, social media is increasingly being used across all age demographics, with people aged 5 plus being the fastest growing users of Facebook.

Email still has an essential role in reaching communities and the number of email accounts overshadows the use of social media. Email, like most other tools, can be integrated, providing the option to share content via Facebook, Twitter or other networks.

Integrating these tools saves time by reducing duplication and the need to write multiple content. In addition, the use of sharing assists in promotion by encouraging recipients to distribute content through their networks.

While it is imperative that there are clear guidelines and policies for social media usage, this should not be used to deter its usage within an organisation. There should be the clear identification of official spokespeople and individuals should use social media to support these official roles.

The official spokespeople should be the people that respond to difficult situations and seek to resolve these issues. It is often advisable to resolve situations outside of social media by demonstrating a responsive approach and following up with additional details if required.

Social media can be used effectively by the government and the public sector. Ultimately it is important that the public sector is part of the conversation that occurs on social media so that it can respond and be part of this discussion.

The community will be discussing government and policies and the public sector should be part of this discussion, just as it is within traditional media outlets.

The two-day conference provided several insights and examples of social media within the public sector.