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technology Archives - Syneka Marketing

General Assembly Warehouse Party

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

General Assembly is a learning centre based in the Melbourne CBD that focuses on delivering courses on technology, business and design.

General Assembly held an end of year warehouse party and we were in attendance. The party attracted a young and vibrant crowd.

We look forward to reconnecting with General Assembly in 2016.

Slush Down Under 2015

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SLUSH Down Under aims to connect technology entrepreneurs with investors so they can realise their vision.  As sponsors of Melbourne Silicon Beach we were invited to the conference and after party, where we had a chance to meet people active in the Startup space.

The key challenges for startups, includes the need to attract investment and commercialise their ideas. A great idea is often not enough, there is a need to develop business and marketing plans to provide the foundations for a viable business model.

Our involvement with Melbourne Silicon Beach enables us to work with the Startup community to develop these foundations. Marketing should be supporting the next wave of innovation to ensure that great ideas reach their full market potential.

Seek’s new marketing campaign – an example of a brand becoming too comfortable and losing its focus

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A few years ago I wrote a post about the state of University advertising and how at the time it failed to inspire. Recently, I was quite surprised to see that Seek was following a similar style to these advertisements.

Seek was one of the first businesses in Australia to succeed as a disruptive start up. The impact of Seek has been prolific, it has been able to transform the job market and in doing so, it has demonstrated how technology adds value for both job seekers and employers.

Against many odds, including the international players in the market, Seek has become the market leader as source for finding jobs and recruiting positions.

In the past, Seek undertook a cheeky and innovative approach to advertising, creating campaigns that were witty and clever. Now it appears as Seek has grown, it has changed this approach.

A past campaign

A past campaign

A play on words Source: Smart

A play on words Source: Smart

Seek in its latest campaign, has decided have focused on photographing a series of people, both young and old, who want change in their lives. The tag line “make it count” has been used to reinforce the change. While advocating for Australians to go out there and change their lives, the implementation of this campaign has been poor.

The subjects used in the photography all have serious and unhappy looks on their faces, almost analogous to individuals in not-for-profit advertising, portraying that they have been hard-done-by. These advertisements do not connect with those of us who may be unhappy in our jobs and are looking for a change. Instead the people in these advertisements seem stuck and unable to escape the situations that they are in, reinforcing that sometimes life isn’t fair.

One of the advertisement at a tram stop

One of the advertisement at a tram stop

 

Seek's Make it Count campaign

Seek’s Make it Count campaign

Universities in this country have the advantage of being in a market where there is strong demand. They also do not have an extensive number of competitors and can sometimes, unfortunately make do with poorly implemented marketing campaigns. Seek on the other hand cannot.

With the technology sector consistently building on its innovations, Seek cannot afford to become comfortable. Seek was able to become a market leader because it took risks, focused on being innovative and demonstrated its value to the Australian public. It seems to have forgotten this strategic approach.

We would encourage Seek to revisit their strategy to ensure they continue to position themselves as a market leader and innovator.

Alex will be speaking at the Australian Computer Society

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Alex will be speaking at the Australian Computer Society’s Entrepreneurship and Innovation Special Interest Group on the Entrepreneurial Journey – Challenges and Rewards.

Technology and product development is one milestone in the entrepreneurial journey. The ability to understand and connect with your target markets is what will separate success from failure. Marketing is an integral part of the entrepreneurial journey and ensures you will receive a positive return from your technology ideas.

Telstra Conference Centre
Conference Room 1, Level 1, 242 Exhibition Street, Melbourne

5:30pm registration for a 6:00pm start on Tuesday 28th April 2015

Register online

Free for members of the Australian Computer Society or $30 for non-members.

Startup Grind Melbourne

Startup Grind – February 2015

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

We attended Startup Grind’s February 2015 meet up at Holding Redlich. This month’s speakers were the founders of Outware Mobile – Danny Gorog and Eytan Lenko.

Danny and Eytan spoke openly about the formation of Outware Mobile and their journey into transforming their business into a company that employs over a hundred people.

Startup Grind February 2015

Startup Grind February 2015

Outware mobile is an example of a technology start up that has achieved scale and worked to its strengths.

Working to your strengths is an important part of how you market your business.

At Syneka Marketing we have many clients who work with emerging technologies. Attending Startup Grind provides us with the opportunity to connect with businesses active in the technology and innovation space.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

Marketing isn’t Dead, but it does need to be redefined

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Last week The Harvard Business Review Online published an article ‘Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’, which, due to its sensationalist headline was quickly circulated via social media.

While I normally wouldn’t respond to such content, the fact that it has been published on a reputable online platform, and came up in several conversations over the week, has led me to revisit how marketing does need to be redefined.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

While the author claims that the Chief Marketing Officer should be replaced by the Chief Loyalty Officer, there is a failure to recognise that loyalty is created through a brand, which is executed through a marketing plan.

As a result, the premise is incorrect, given that the author defines marketing as “selling products”, and not the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large (American Marketing Association, Definition of Marketing, Approved July 2013), which is a viewpoint shared by the Australian Marketing Institute.

Furthermore, the case studies, which cite Chioptle and Apple, fail to recognise the role of marketing in creating the value proposition that fosters ongoing customer loyalty.

Apple has strong consumer loyalty, due to its disruptive approach to technology, which encompasses quality, design, ease of use, as well as an ecosystem that serves to cross-sell and support complementary products. This loyalty was fostered through a marketing approach that executed each of these elements in a consistent and seamless manner. What Apple has done well is determine its strategic marketing direction and follow this through with execution. The few times this execution has been underwhelming, there has been a negative reaction to its overall brand value. As an example, the replacement of Google Maps, with Apple Maps, which at the time did not meet the perception of quality, demonstrated how an inconsistent approach adversely impacted the brand and marketing approach.

Loyalty is not created, it is initiated through a strategic marketing plan that recognises the importance of customers. These customers serve as evangelists, and in turn stimulate repeat purchases, as well as support complementary products or services. Apple in devising its approach to the iPod and iPhone, would have recognised that its customers, and in particularly its niche in design, were an existing strength.

The narrow viewpoint of marketing is unfortunately far too common. What is unexpected, however is when a reputable platform, such as the Harvard Business Review, publishes such views.

Marketing begins with strategy. This strategic direction identifies the value proposition and the marketing mix that is required to achieve these outcomes. For many businesses loyalty is a direction that is part of this mix.

Marketing does need to be redefined, primarily because far too many people have been able to claim that they are ‘marketers’, without adhering to a professional standard. The author of ‘ Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’ is a clear example of this.