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target demographics Archives - Syneka Marketing

Inside a Marketing Plan – Your Strategies Set The Direction

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | One Comment

Last week we discussed the importance of capturing the right information when developing a marketing plan. The Capture Phase lets you gain insights in your business, markets, competitors and other aspects that will influence demand.

We’re continuing the exploration of our marketing methodology, by exploring the Strategy Phase. This component is the second part of the marketing methodology and builds on the information you gathered during the capture phase.

The Strategy Phase considers what strategies will achieve your marketing goals

Begin by analysing the information you captured

The strategies for your business should be informed by the findings from the capture phase. You need to understand what the data is telling you to identify where there may be merit in developing specific strategies.

For example, if you wish to introduce a new product, consider the target demographics and the motivating factors that would influence purchase decisions. One of your strategies would specifically develop this market, with the aim of delivering sales and revenue growth.

Understanding the information you have gathered will ensure that your strategies are relevant and will deliver positive results.

Be open to engagement

The Strategy Phase should be open to collaboration and there is merit in involving stakeholders and staff to ensure that they are able to contribute their observations.

Several methods exist to encourage engagement, including workshops, interviews or surveys. Often you may need to use several of these methods to reach all relevant stakeholders, depending on their level of engagement. Often you can involve staff in an internal workshop, hold selected interviews with key customers and then conduct a survey seeking wider input. Each of these methods are valid and should have a consistent foundation to ensure that you can compare results. Furthermore, consistency will enable you to benchmark future results to identify trends and measure performance.

Consider all options

You need to consider all possible options during the strategy phase. The aim of this phase is to think strategically about your business and its possibilities. Subsequently, you will be able to identify the strategies that are the right fit for your business and which will be included in the final marketing plan.

If you have a seasonal product, such as ice cream, one relevant strategy would be the introduction of complementary food, such as waffles, that may be more suitable for winter. This would be a sound strategy, as it would reduce seasonal fluctuations, but may not be suitable if you are planning on being known exclusively for ice cream.

The final strategies that you select for your marketing plan should be consistent with the research, validate the engagement that was undertaken and reinforce the strategic direction of your business.

Your strategy sets your direction

The Strategy Phase is where you begin to explore future options and possibilities. Taking the time to identify the right strategies ensures that the resources you allocate will achieve results.

The Strategy Phase establishes the criteria you will use to measure the success of your marketing plan.

Social Media Training for Community and Not-For-Profit Organisations

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Social media provides an opportunity to extend the reach of not-for-profit organisations and develop further dialogue with stakeholders. Far too many organisations, either ignore social media due to a lack of understanding, or rush into it while failing to recognize the need for an integrated marketing approach.

This morning I delivered a workshop for not-for-profit organisations based in the Yarra Ranges,  covering Melbourne’s outer eastern suburbs, as well as regional townships like Healesville and Warburton.  The workshop covered marketing fundamentals, ensuring that social media is seen as a potential marketing tool that requires a strategic approach.

Like other forms of marketing, there is a need for a consistent approach to social media. Each social media platform, has its own target demographics, and it is important to use the right tools to reach the right people. Platforms like Facebook, can be useful in establishing active communities around organisations. Twitter can be used to provide short and sharp updates on activities. LinkedIn however, enables the fostering of business connections and dialogue through its interactive groups.

Integrating social media with your website, saves time by replicating content across multiple channels, meaning that you are able to provide a consistent message, regardless of how someone connects with your organisation. Most websites support social media integration, with this approach providing time to foster communities, rather than manually adding content.

Like any form of external communications, there is a need to establish policies that guide the use of social media.  Spokespeople should be identified and charged with the responsibility of posting official content.  Other members of the organisation should be encouraged to discuss these topics and to interact with the community.

The official spokespeople should also manage any adverse commentary that may occur.  Organisations should engage negative comments, seeking to resolve complaints outside of social media while highlighting the resolution.  Offensive comments, however, should be immediately removed with an indication that the content violated the organisation’s policies.

Social media can be an extremely effective communication tool when it is used to complement other marketing activities.  It is critical that all marketing and communications is consistent to provide cohesive messages that cut-through and prompt a response.

Today’s workshop discussed the context of social media and delved into the practical components on Facebook and Twitter.  A subsequent course will be held at the Yarra Ranges to exclusively examine the practical elements of using social media.

 

 

Whitehorse Community Health – Community Advisory Group

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Whitehorse Community Health Service originated in 1985 as the Box Hill Community Health Service.  The organisation provides a range of health services, including dentistry, counselling and preventive health programs.

This morning I was invited to speak to the organisation’s Community Advisory Group, to discuss marketing and social media.  The Community Advisory Group consists of nominated members who provide advice to the organisation with a wider community perspective.

One of the focal areas for the service is preventative health.  This model of health focuses prevention, rather than treating health concerns once they occur. Social media can be useful in promoting preventative health messages, particularly in using peer based marketing to help reach target groups.

Like all health services, it is important that its messages reach a wide community demographic and social media should form part of this approach.   A preventative health model reduces absenteeism, improves wellbeing and is more cost efficient than a traditional model.

Preventative health, however, is only effective when it reaches its target demographics and marketing forms a critical component in ensuring the success of this approach.