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target audience Archives - Syneka Marketing

Visit Brisbane ad

Is it Visit Brisbane or Visit Melbourne?

By | Government | No Comments

As a strategic marketing agency it is our role to assist clients in determining their unique value proposition, which in turn informs their target markets and marketing mix. Over the break I encountered this billboard at Southern Cross Station:

 

At first, I thought that it was perhaps an advertisement for a restaurant at South Warf, given it is approximately 1 kilometre from Southern Cross Station and has almost the exact same look and feel as this advertisement.

On closer inspection, I realised that this was not an advertisement for South Warf, but for Brisbane.

Visit Brisbane ad

Visit Brisbane ad

Brisbane, unlike other areas in Queensland, is the urban centre, with a population of 2.3 million. It doesn’t have the glitzy beaches and hotels like the Gold Coast or the pristine scenery of the Whitsunday’s; and in many ways it is a lot like Melbourne.

Brisbane Marketing is the official tourism organisation for Brisbane, with one of its goals to increase interstate tourism from Melbourne. Unfortunately, this campaign has not understood this target audience.

South Warf Melbourne

South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

There is no point creating a tourism campaign that looks like it was shot in Melbourne and then sold to people in Melbourne, when they can get the same experience walking 12 minutes from Southern Cross Station.

Tourism exists to generate a return, and while this campaign goes beyond the typical flora and fauna approach it does not look at how to position Brisbane’s strengths relative to Melbourne.

We encourage Brisbane Marketing to look strategically at their target audiences and start creating campaigns that these audiences with value.

Marketing – Your short-term action need to strengthen your long-term position

By | News | No Comments

As a strategic marketing agency we work with our clients to align their business goals with marketing outcomes. The end result is a combination of short-term actions that can be implemented immediately and activities that build the capacity of a business over the longer-term. Like personal goals, business goals can take time, perseverance, strategy and dedication to accomplish.

Unfortunately in today’s fast paced environment it can be far too easy to rush into ill-considered short-term actions, which can have a detrimental impact on growth over the longer term. Aggressive pricing discounts are one of the most evident examples of this approach, whereby a short-term spike in sales, will often jeopardise the value proposition over the longer term.  Pricing is one element of the marketing mix and needs to be considered in tandem with all aspects of your business.

A tactics led approach can perpetuate business uncertainty, given that there is little consideration on the overall impact of a business. As a consequence, the wrong metrics are often collated, providing numbers that appear positive, but have little value. Classic examples include website visitations, when the more important metric is conversion and measuring the desire to purchase.

Furthermore, marketing activities do not work in isolation, and there is a need to measure the effectiveness of several activities across the entire decision making process. The evaluation of your marketing activities need to not only look at the performance of each tactic, but also their collective impact.

Unfortunately, it can often be difficult for business owners to view their business objectively, leading to poor judgement around strategic marketing decisions. Marketers need to demonstrate strategic expertise to ensure that all activities are assessed objectively and in the context of business goals.

The lack of objectivity is often evidenced in the rush for the latest trend, where the buzz blurs the metrics that actually matter. Content is the current example, whereby content for contents sake achieves little, but a targeted approach aimed at connecting and engaging target audiences, can have merit.  Social media was previously caught in a similar buzz, with metrics highlighting Facebook likes, but with little consideration on the need to convert these likes into advocates and customers.

A strategic approach looks beyond the buzz and begins by viewing a business holistically. There is a focus on relevant metrics, so that a business is able to measure outcomes and adjust to changing needs as required. As result, marketing activities focus on overall impact, ensuring a consistent experience that motivates purchase decisions.

Importantly there are often compounding benefits to a strategic approach, with short-term initiatives strengthening over time and reinforcing the value proposition of a business.

Business success is never going to be achieved by looking at discrete short-term actions, or rushing to the latest buzzwords.  Focus on your longer-term aspirations and begin by exploring initiatives that can be achieved in short-term while being consistent with your business goals.

What is Marketing?

What is Marketing?

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations | 7 Comments

Marketing is unfortunately one of the most misunderstood functions in businesses and organisations. Professional Marketers have unfortunately allowed the term to be hijacked – through telemarketing, direct marketing, SEO marketing – and by others, who claim to offer marketing, but without the foundations to ensure ongoing success.

Marketing is created when you leverage the tools you have to achieve your organisation's goals

Marketing is created when you leverage the tools you have to achieve your organisation’s goals

The definition

Marketing has no standard definition – the key terms even differ between professional marketing associations.

The American Marketing Association defines marketing as:

Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.

While the Australian Marketing Institute uses the following definition:

Marketing creates value – for customers, shareholders and society as a whole. It does this by creating an alignment between what consumers value and what organisations offer. It offers techniques that help firms better understand the needs, preferences and perceptions of their customers (a prerequisite to adding value to them), and ways of using that understanding to focus the value-creating and communicating activities of the firm into areas where they will be most effective.

While the definitions differ, there is the common element of value, ensuring organisations provide value that resonates with customers, clients and other stakeholders.

Marketing – more than the sum of the parts

Marketing is more than sales, advertising, logos, promotion or processes – it is about leveraging the combined effort of your business or organisation to achieve its goals and mission.

Marketing starts with strategy. It considers the capabilities of your organisation and assesses the wider operating context to outline the steps required to achieve the goals you want for your organisation.

A marketing plan works in tandem with your business plan, providing the context and identifying steps that are required. A business plan identifies what you want to achieve, a marketing plan shows how you achieve these outcomes.

A logo on its own is not marketing, nor is a brochure, website or Twitter account. Marketing is when the logo is used to create a brand, providing an identity that is used in a brochure, website or Twitter account to communicate messages that reach and resonate with a target audience.

Marketing is when you leverage each of these tools to achieve the goals you have set for your organisation.

Beware the Pretenders

There are unfortunately many operators who are nothing more than pretenders – hijacking the marketing term through promises that cannot be kept.

You can use more than one provider to draw on specific expertise, but each of them should understand your goals and how they fit into the bigger picture. Services that neglect the bigger picture will do more harm than good, offering suggestions that fail to understand the people, processes and strengths of your organisation.

The consequences

Failing to understand the bigger picture can harm the reputation of your organisation, by creating conflicting messages that erode the value of your brand.

Let’s consider a brand likes Porsche. If Porsche wanted to increase sales then one option would be aggressive price discounts. Reducing prices would most likely result in a short-term increase in sales, but would also erode the prestige that Porsche has established over many years. The end result would be conflicting messages and an eroded brand that would adversely impact sales and reputation into the future.

A holistic marketing approach would understand the strengths of the brand and provide strategies that do not erode an organisation’s value.

Retail is experiencing a similar issue in Australia, where the focus has been on price rather than service.

There was a time when shoppers travelled to Myer to experience its highly regarded levels of service. Over time a focus on reducing prices resulted in staff reductions and a lower level of service, making Myer just another department store.

Along came online stores, who can undercut traditional retailers because they do not have the same cost pressures.

Unfortunately, retailers have focused predominately on price, without leveraging the strengths provided by a store presence. The result is an erosion of their unique selling proposition, or the attributes that distinguish one organisation from another. Retail needs to focus on the experience: service, personalisation and where shoppers are able to see what they want to buy.

Don’t damage your brand

While a standard definition of marketing is unlikely to be agreed upon soon – it is time to recapture what marketing is and the value it provides.

Don’t risk your organisation with providers who fail to understand the bigger picture and do not provide the steps to get you there.

Success starts with strategy – know what you want to achieve and then plan the steps required to get you there.

Managing Volunteers - Take the Next Step

Managing Volunteers – Take the Next Step

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Many not-for-profit organisations rely on volunteers for service delivery and to assist with administration and other functions.

Managing Volunteers – Take the Next Step, was a full day conference hosted by the Shire of Yarra Ranges and Eastern Volunteers. The conference discussed several topics relevant to volunteer management national standards, the steps required to prepare an organisation for volunteers, as well as marketing and promoting an organisation.

I presented a session for the afternoon workshop, discussing the Essentials of Social Media and Marketing.  The presentation discussed the need for a strategic marketing approach, to identify aims and to understand what would attract volunteers to assist with the organisation.

Organisations need consistent messages to demonstrate the volunteer experiences that are created through their involvement.  Messages need to be communicated using a range of marketing tools to reach prospective volunteers through multiple communication channels.

Social media is one of the tools that can be used to reach prospective volunteers and should be considered as a part of a cohesive marketing campaign.  Social media should be integrated with website content, providing the seamless ability to update websites, as well as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social media sites

It is important to utilise the strengths of each tool and one advantage of social media is the ability to share content.  The intent should not necessarily be to develop viral content, but to ensure your target audience is able to distribute content and share their views on being involved with the organisation.  Stories can be very effective and assist in providing content that can be shared.  The sharing of content is the online equivalent of word of mouth recommendations and can help reach the connections of people already involved with the organisation.

Successful volunteer recruitment will use a mix of tools to reach prospective volunteers, supported by consistent messages and a cohesive marketing approach. Marketing encompasses more than promotional tools, such as brochures or flyers, but every form of interaction that someone has with an organisation.

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Connecting Up Guest Post – Foundations of a Marketing Campaign

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | 5 Comments

I will be speaking at the #CU12 Conference where I will be presenting the session Marketing Your Strengths from 1:30pm at North Wharf 1 on Wednesday.

Connecting Up is a not-for-profit organisation that encourages the use and adoption of IT within community organisations, with the conference covering marketing, social media and information technology.

ConnectingUp encouraged presenters to provide a guest blog post and the following article provides an introduction to our Power Session – Marketing Your Strengths:

Need a good example of a successful marketing campaign? Alex Makin from Syneka Marketing shares a case study from Eastern Volunteers

Marketing, like most other activities, works best when you identify your goals. Know what it is you want to achieve and why. This will influence who you will target with your marketing messages, as well as the best methods to reach them.

Know Your Goals

A marketing campaign will not deliver positive results if you have not clearly defined these goals. Once you have identified your goals, you can then determine your target audience. Some campaigns, such as fundraising targets, may have multiple audiences and while there may be differences in the message, there should be a consistent theme.

As a case study, let’s consider a marketing campaign we initiated for Eastern Volunteers, a regional not-for-profit organisation, based in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs. Eastern Volunteers has established a fundraising target to assist in relocating to the ground floor of a building they have purchased.

Currently, the organisation is located on the first floor, creating accessibility issues for its members and clients. As an organisation that provides community assisted transport and volunteer recruitment, there is a need for an accessible and inclusive environment.

The key marketing message was framed around creating an accessible and inclusive community service, reinforced by the permanency that will be created by moving into this building.

Know Your Audience

Now that we have identified a key message, we need to consider who we will be targeting. Know the best method to reach this target audience and the tools you can use to reinforce this message.

A fundraising campaign like Eastern Volunteers requires a multi-faceted approach. There are several target audiences, such as clients, members of other community organisations, business partners, government and the wider community.

Executing the Campaign

For Eastern Volunteers, clients and members can be reached through the quarterly Eastern Volunteers newsletter. While the newsletter has traditionally included a donation slip, the response rate has been low since there hadn’t been a key message framed around seeking donations. The building fund edition of the newsletter prominently featured the campaign and the call for donations. This resulted in an extremely positive response to the campaign and a significant number of donations.

Other organisations and business partners have been targeted through an official launch of the campaign. Official launches can also assist in reaching local Councillors and Members of Parliament, however sufficient lead-time must be provided for these invitations.

Launches can also assist in encouraging media coverage. It is imperative that media releases are considered as part of your campaign. Media coverage helps raise the profile of your campaign and extend its reach. When planning a marketing campaign, consider how it could be supported through a series media releases. Media outlets will not repeat the same content on an ongoing basis so different hooks are required to encourage ongoing interest.

<h2?Be Consistent

Consistency is the key to undertaking successful marketing campaigns. Your message needs to be consistent across all forms of marketing communication with a clear call to action. The call to action is the desired result you are seeking from someone that sees your marketing message.

In the example of Eastern Volunteers, the call to action is clearly the request for a donation and this is clearly stated across all communication tools.

Generally someone needs to see a marketing message several times before they are prompted to respond to the call to action. It is worthwhile considering a variety of appropriate communication tools that can reach this target audience.

Visit www.connectingup.org/blog/foundations-marketing-campaign to view this guest post at ConnectingUp.

Meet Syneka Marketing at #CU12 in Sydney

Natalia Perera, our Creative Director will be leading our team in Melbourne during my time in Sydney. I will be in Sydney until Thursday and have some remaining time available for meetings and in-depth discussions.

Maroondah Business Association – AGM and Social Networking

By | Advice for Businesses, News | No Comments

The Maroondah Business Association, which was formerly known as Maroondah HomeBiz, provides a supportive and nurturing environment for businesses within Maroondah.  The Association has an emphasis on networking, business knowledge, workshops and practical support through providing monthly guest speakers and other events.

Tonight’s guest speaker discussed social networking providing an overview of the various social networking sites and their relevance to an increasing demographic. The speaker offered insight into the various social media tools and some background in regard to search engine optimization.

While businesses need to certainly utilize social networking, its usage needs to be viewed in the context of an overarching marketing strategy.  It is imperative that a business is consistent in its forms of communication to ensure that key messages are articulated clearly and accurately. A marketing plan will help leverage the strengths of differing mediums to ensure a comprehensive approach to reaching your target audience.

The Maroondah Business Association picks two businesses that can provide an overview on their products or services. Syneka was chosen to provide an overview and I will be introducing Syneka’s services to the group at the next meeting.