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system Archives - Syneka Marketing

Business over Breakfast – Exploring ICT

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Business Over Breakfast is a fortnightly business network series based in the Docklands, focused on relationship building and collaboration. Each session provides an opportunity to explore one of the member’s business in further detail. This morning we explored the role of ICT in providing the infrastructure required for a business to operate successfully, including the need to manage applications, users and security of systems.

The sessions encourage participants to gain an understanding of the core products and services offered by each member and their ideal customers, as well as exploring the potential for collaboration and delivering a greater level of impact.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

Marketing isn’t Dead, but it does need to be redefined

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Last week The Harvard Business Review Online published an article ‘Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’, which, due to its sensationalist headline was quickly circulated via social media.

While I normally wouldn’t respond to such content, the fact that it has been published on a reputable online platform, and came up in several conversations over the week, has led me to revisit how marketing does need to be redefined.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

While the author claims that the Chief Marketing Officer should be replaced by the Chief Loyalty Officer, there is a failure to recognise that loyalty is created through a brand, which is executed through a marketing plan.

As a result, the premise is incorrect, given that the author defines marketing as “selling products”, and not the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large (American Marketing Association, Definition of Marketing, Approved July 2013), which is a viewpoint shared by the Australian Marketing Institute.

Furthermore, the case studies, which cite Chioptle and Apple, fail to recognise the role of marketing in creating the value proposition that fosters ongoing customer loyalty.

Apple has strong consumer loyalty, due to its disruptive approach to technology, which encompasses quality, design, ease of use, as well as an ecosystem that serves to cross-sell and support complementary products. This loyalty was fostered through a marketing approach that executed each of these elements in a consistent and seamless manner. What Apple has done well is determine its strategic marketing direction and follow this through with execution. The few times this execution has been underwhelming, there has been a negative reaction to its overall brand value. As an example, the replacement of Google Maps, with Apple Maps, which at the time did not meet the perception of quality, demonstrated how an inconsistent approach adversely impacted the brand and marketing approach.

Loyalty is not created, it is initiated through a strategic marketing plan that recognises the importance of customers. These customers serve as evangelists, and in turn stimulate repeat purchases, as well as support complementary products or services. Apple in devising its approach to the iPod and iPhone, would have recognised that its customers, and in particularly its niche in design, were an existing strength.

The narrow viewpoint of marketing is unfortunately far too common. What is unexpected, however is when a reputable platform, such as the Harvard Business Review, publishes such views.

Marketing begins with strategy. This strategic direction identifies the value proposition and the marketing mix that is required to achieve these outcomes. For many businesses loyalty is a direction that is part of this mix.

Marketing does need to be redefined, primarily because far too many people have been able to claim that they are ‘marketers’, without adhering to a professional standard. The author of ‘ Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’ is a clear example of this.

BNI Melbourne East

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Business Network International is a worldwide organisation that fosters business networking. This morning I was invited to a meeting of BNI Melbourne East to meet businesses that are seeking to establish Melbourne’s latest BNI Chapter.

Given that the Chapter is nearing official formation, there was a presentation on how BNI functions and the expected role of its participants. As a business networking group, BNI has a focus on generating member referrals and this system was discussed as part of the presentation.

BNI Melbourne East requires just a few more members to become a charted BNI Chapter and should be officiated shortly.

The co-dependence between Marketing and IT

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | 2 Comments

Marketing and Information Technology are often seen as disparate functions with little overlap. In reality, however, both are required for any organisation or business to operate successfully. As a result there is an increasing co-dependence between both of these areas.

Marketing requires valid information so you can make the right assumptions and create strategies that deliver positive results. IT, through websites, customer relationship management (CRM) systems and point of sale data collection, provides the ability to capture data and to analyse this information to deliver insights.

As an example, websites have traditionally been seen as an IT exercise, with little consideration of usability and end user interaction. Undertaking this approach, means that your website will not take into consideration the needs of your target customers and will diminish the ability to achieve sales or inquiries.

A marketing approach, utilities available technology to deliver outcomes that support the goals and direction of your business. Through a marketing approach, a website would be developed from understanding the needs it would fulfill, including an an assessment of your target customers and how they interact with your business. The website appearance and functionality would support this interaction, so that it can guide visitors to achieve the goals you have for your site. Furthermore, a marketing approach would ensure that your website adapts the existing style and identity you have for your business, to ensure a consistent appearance and level of interaction.

Similarly, CRM systems help maintain contact with customers and store relevant information about them, your products and transaction history. While the storage of information is an IT exercise, marketing involves the use of this information to deliver insights that will achieve your business objectives. A marketing perspective would utilize this data to identify customers that require more frequent contact, or may be suitable for additional purchases.

If you do not have a CRM, then you would have the challenge of collating information and storing data in a centralized location. This results in inefficiency and makes it harder to analyse data to gain insights, such as frequency, variations between customers and even basic contact details.

For many businesses, marketing and information technology is not a core focus. Investing in marketing and information technology enables you to scale your business and to build capacity to facilitate growth.

The collaboration between marketing and information technology is only going to increase into the future. It is important to have the right systems in place to support your marketing initiatives.

Good Marketing Requires a Sound Methodology

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

We are pleased to announce the release of our second book: “Marketing Methodology that Works.”

This book is based on our strategic approach to marketing.

Our free eBook Marketing Methodology that Works, introduces the concept of strategic marketing and its use in developing marketing plans and implementation activities.

Marketing Methodology that Works will guide you through a systematic and research based approach. Marketing is often perceived to be esoteric, but there is a need to utilise research so you can validate findings and provide an informed direction. Marketing can and should be measurable.

Sound research is required to ensure that marketing tools, such as graphic design, sales, copywriting, search engine optimisation (SEO) and website development, reinforces the direction of your marketing plan.

Our proven methodology has delivered tangible results for our clients. We are now sharing our knowledge and methodology, so we can assist in strengthening the outcomes that are created through marketing. We want to ensure that marketing is measurable and outcome focused so that it achieves your vision.

The eBook explores our marketing framework of Audit, Planning and Execution, to provide a review of existing activities, planning for growth and delivering on anticipated outcomes.

We also cover our methodology of Capture, Strategy and Deliver.  This methodology ensures that the right information is obtained, providing a basis for sound strategy, that is reflected through activities that deliver results.

Marketing Methodology That Works builds on our work in defining marketing, which was explored in our first eBook What is Marketing? Both eBooks is also available as a free download.

Combined, these eBooks will bolster the marketing capacity of your business or organisation so that you can plan and execute marketing activities that deliver results.

Marketing Methodology that Works is a free eBook, available for download from www.synekamarketing.com.au/ebooks.

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An implementation plan can make your goals a reality

Do you make New Year’s resolutions for your business?

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January is almost over, and like so many of us I am trying to keep up with my own New Year’s resolutions.

For many businesses and organisations, a New Year marks a fresh start. Many of you may have ended 2013 with resolutions in the form of goals, sales targets or adopting new ways of doing things.

Setting goals and starting fresh is a great idea, especially if plans were sidetracked over the course of last year.

One of the ways we manage the process of working towards our goals is through an implementation plan.

Our implementation plan for 2014 has been developed by looking at the actions and strategies set out in our business and marketing plans. Implementation plans need to be systematic and realistic. For example, as January is generally a slow month for us, we don’t set revenue targets that are the same as the latter months of the year.

An implementation plan can make your goals a reality

An implementation plan can make your goals a reality

We like to use a Gantt chart to depict our implementation plan. Gantt charts provide a progress map that can be monitored over a specific timeframe. Gantt charts are customisable, and can be used to track daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, or even yearly performance. Some CRM systems can be integrated with Gantt charts, enabling your IT infrastructure to automatically monitor progress.

Having a Gantt chart can provide you with both the big picture, and the finer details required to achieve your goals. These charts also have the added bonus of acting as motivators.

Implementation is an important part of the goal setting process, as it provides guidance on how to achieve tangible outcomes.

If you are worried about not being able to achieve your resolutions for 2014, why not develop an implementation plan and make your goals a reality.