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principle Archives - Syneka Marketing

We’ve defined customer experience – now connect it to the customer journey

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Resources | No Comments

We recently discussed the need for marketing to move beyond buzzwords and to instead re-claim the definition of customer experience, which forms the very core of marketing theory. Our thoughts have now been viewed organically by over 5000 people in just 48 hours via LinkedIn, and continues to be actively being shared across key social media channels.

Interest in this article has demonstrated why marketing needs to reclaim its core remit, so today we are going to exploring another buzzword: customer journey.

In defining the customer experience, we returned to the core of marketing theory through the marketing mix. The overall customer experience is going to be defined by the impact of the impressions that are made across each of these elements.

We need to return to fundamentals to explore the customer journey, as we explore the steps that are taken for someone to become a customer and ideally remain so on an ongoing basis.

Phases in the Customer Journey

There are three interconnected phases within the customer journey:

  • Pre-purchase – where the aim is to raise awareness with your target markets and ensure that your brand is actively considered by these prospective customers.
  • The Purchase phase – where the prospect becomes a customer. This is where they commit to purchasing your product or service and the perceptions of its brand.
  • The Post-purchase phase – where your customer considers the outcomes and value they received, based on their perceptions and the outcomes that were achieved.

The three phases of the customer journey as mapped to the decision making process
The three phases of the customer journey as mapped to the decision making process.

 

The Decision Making Process has its origins in consumer behaviour stemming from the 1960s. We have adapted this model to explore each phase in the customer journey, as viewed through the decision making process. It explores both the rational (such as pricing and function) and perceptual (attitudes and subjective impressions) aspects that influence the decision.

The customer journey is not linear and this particularly true if there is a desire to build loyalty and repeat purchases. The experience you are creating through the marketing mix will impact on the ability to successfully transition your target market through the customer journey. The customer experience relates to their interaction with your business or brand, while the customer journey views this from the customer perspective as they identify the best fit for their needs.

Like other buzzwords in marketing there is a need to return to core principles, a Marketing Manager should have the ability to influence factors that assist in transitioning customers through the journey.  We will be continuing this series as we turn our attention to measuring both the customer experience and journey.

Exploring the customer experience through the marketing mix

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Government | No Comments

Last time we explored the current buzz around the term customer experience. While it is positive to see an emphasis on the customer perspective, in reality this concept is nothing new and is a rehash of the original marketing mix.

While the marketing mix is fundamental to the discipline, it is often an area that many businesses fail to get right, partly due to the dilution of what customer experience actually means.

A successful experience is where all elements of the marketing mix provide consistency, instils confidence in the purchase decision, and mitigates doubt. The marketing mix helps ensure that all aspects of your organisation, from back-end processes through to front-end communications reinforce your value proposition.

The Marketing Mix (otherwise known as the 7Ps of Marketing)

The Marketing Mix demonstrates the intended breadth of marketing:

  • Pricing should be consistent with the value proposition.
  • Distribution channels or placement reflects this positioning,
  • Provision of physical evidence to demonstrate outcomes.
  • Internal processes should facilitate the engagement of customers.
  • Promotion and communications needs to reflect the value proposition to reach the intended target markets.
  • The actual products or services should be designed inline with customer requirements.
  • The people and personnel should reinforce the image of the business and the core value of the brands it provides.

While the Marketing Mix is the cornerstone of marketing, many marketing managers do not have the required visibility or influence across each of these areas. As a result there is a the potential risk of inconsistency, which can tarnish reputations and diminish customer reach.

Kiki K – an example in the marketing mix:

Kikki K is a brand that designs and sells stationery, consistent with Swedish design principles. It challenges its customers to utilise stationery to create the life they want. Ultimately it uses these aspirations to position stationery as the creator of these dreams.

Kikki K’s stores reflect this aesthetic and this is continued through its digital presence, print collateral and the attitude of the staff. The customer experience is further emphasised by Kikki K conducting events that aim to inspire its target markets through the achievement of dreasms.

The business has created a successful stationery brand with a premium pricing model, despite the commoditisation of the sector through competitors such as Officeworks. The reason this works is due to an approach that provides consistency across the marketing mix. Kikki K has a clearly defined target market and has positioned each element of the marketing mix to reinforce this experience.

2015-09-25 Kikki K Store

And another example:

Contrast this to another example: Telstra, which in recent years has been trying to win the hearts and minds of Australians through interconnectedness and personalisation. While its public communications are promoting a friendly and approachable business, this is often not consistent with the experience customers receive through Telstra’s support systems or retail outlets. While Telstra is fortunate to leverage its history as a regulated entity, most other businesses are not so lucky and would suffer reputational risk and loss of market share due to this lack of integration.

Marketing is holistic

Effective marketing achieves outcomes because it is more than just front-end communications. Real marketing undertakes a holistic approach to deliver consistency and confidence throughout the entire customer journey.

Governance Mentors

Governance Mentors – Inaugural Training

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | One Comment

Governance Mentors is a new initiative developed by Volunteering Western Victoria. The program aims to strengthen the capacity of the not-for-profit sector, by pairing mentors with community organisations.

The program has been developed over the past two years, with a steering group developing a model that incorporates measurement and evaluation. Governance Mentors reached an important milestone, with the first training session being conducted.

We prepared the marketing plan for Governance Mentors, identifying opportunities for growth and development. To support the plan, I participated in the training session, with the aim of becoming a mentor within the program.

Governance Mentors is a program that has been developed to help boards and committees achieve their aims

Governance Mentors has been developed to help boards and committees achieve their aims

The training session guided participants through the practice of mentoring, with a focus on providing advice, and reinforcing good governance principles. A mentor aims to provide advice and assist organisations in working towards achieving their aims.

Unlike other programs, Governance Mentors involves working with boards or the committee as a whole, rather than specific individuals. This approach reinforces good governance by demonstrating the role of the board or committee as the decision making authority. In this regard, mentors are available to provide advice, rather than being nominated board or committee members of an organisation.

The program is being progressively rolled out and demonstrates the ongoing growth of an initiative that is underpinned by a marketing plan.

Revolutionise Your Member Engagement – 10 Key Principles

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To serve your members well, and build their loyalty, a set of principles need to be established, and adhered to, by everyone in your organisation.

If the principles are right … the policies are easy.

  • Principle 1 – The Member pays everyone’s wages. The organisation is the paymaster only. Make the relationship successful, the member keeps renewing … and spending.
  • Principle 2 – Behaviour towards Members is directed by three key issues – the first is knowledge (e.g. know your member, know your organisation); the second is skills (IT, sales, service, admin and more); the third is attitude. Guess which is most important? Attitude … by far.
  • Principle 3 – When Members contact your organisation, they want/need/expect something. That ‘something’ is usually … help/assistance/problem solving. If everyone in your organisation knows how to respond, anticipate and help members – your organisation will achieve greatness!
  • Principle 4 – What is the value of a Member? Do you calculate it in terms of the money they spend, the goodwill they spread, the prospects they are capable of bringing to you or …? Do your employees know the value of your Members?
  • Principle 5 – Members in most organisations spend money on more than just their membership. Know how to sell to your Members. More important still – know how to build long term Member Relationships.
  • Principle 6 – Member satisfaction, on its own, is worthless. Satisfaction must engender loyalty among your members.
  • Principle 7WOMM (word of mouth marketing) is more powerful than any other form of marketing or advertising. Your/your staff’s friendliness and willingness to be helpful is in direct proportion to your success.
  • Principle 8 – Tell members what you CAN DO. They probably already know the things you can’t do – take a more positive, proactive approach.
  • Principle 9 – Member Service Excellence is a member’s right. They don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.
  • Principle 10 – The member’s perception becomes their reality. You create their reality – give your members the absolute BEST service, every single time they interact with you.