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presence Archives - Syneka Marketing

Brand and marketing – how they fit together

By | News | One Comment

There is an increasing level of confusion between branding and marketing, with the two terms often being used interchangeably to communicate the visual or strategic objectives of a business.

We have come across many businesses and organisations recently, that have undertaken branding and marketing in the reverse order. This has resulted in a brand being created without a marketing plan, often then requiring the brand to altered when the strategic rigour provided within the marketing plan identifies misalignment.

Branding is a potential output of the strategic marketing planning process and not the other way around. At the base level, a brand enables the differentiation of one business from another, providing a conduit that builds common ground between stakeholders and personnel within the business.

The marketing planning process determines the overall marketing direction of the business. Branding and identity is a potential output and tactic that may be considered. If this is the case then a brand strategy is created which determines the attributes and essence of the brand, as well as guideline around the brand name, presence and brand promise. From this comes the visual identity and complementary creative materials that support the communication of the brand.

With marketing being ill defined, it can be easy for businesses to become confused between the two terms. This is compounded by the fact that Australia is dominated by tacticians of marketing such as the digital agency, creative agency or advertising agency.

2016-06-03 Pencil 1000px x 1000px

For non-marketers, particularly those on boards, it can be easy to take the branding option first rather than to invest in a marketing plan. Often a marketing tactician will show visual examples of their work and draft concepts, causing boards and other decision makers to often ask the wrong questions and hence confuse branding for marketing.

The strategic insights through marketing should always be the first aspect you consider when you look at your marketing mix. Once this step is undertaken, you can then consider what is required to develop a brand that resonates with your marketing direction.

Embedding rigour into marketing – through our Performance Framework

By | Advice for Businesses | One Comment

It is easy to spend time and money on marketing, but a lot harder to ensure that your resources actually deliver a positive impact. As a result, marketing often becomes unaccountable, delivering tactics that generate activity, but underperform in regard to anticipated outcomes.

These issues are due to marketing being undertaken as distinct operational tasks, rather than a core strategic function that secures business growth. Consequently, marketing often lacks a presence at an executive or board room level, despite the reputational and financial risks created through a lack of strategic insight.

Overview of the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology

Ultimately, marketing is designed to strengthen business capacity, yet this is often lacking within marketing itself.

The Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology is designed to embed rigour into marketing, through data analysis, strategic insights and evaluation. As a result, the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology consists of four key modules that have defined methodologies:

  • The Audit – forms the foundations of all marketing projects, by reviewing existing activities and assessing performance.
  • The Forecast – assesses future market conditions, guiding the development of campaign plans and product innovations.
  • The Plan – aligns marketing outcomes with business goals, through implementation schedules that guide and measure marketing activities.
  • Execution – the delivery of marketing outcomes, as per the defined timeframes, with all activities being evaluated on the required outcomes.

Our services, encompassing consulting, workshops, training and management are aligned in accordance with our Framework to ensure transparency and accountability. For further information, view our Guide to the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .

Russel Howcroft on the Power of TV

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

This morning the Australian Marketing Institute held an exclusive session held an exclusive session at the Channel Ten studios, featuring Russel Howcroft who discussed the role of ‘traditional media’ in a digital world.

The role of marketing is to use the right tools across the marketing mix to achieve business outcomes. The traditional forms of communications, through TV, radio and print, remain just as valid today, even with the introduction of digital tools. Multiple communication tools are often required to create action, so there is a need to identify how best to reach and motivate your target markets.

At Network Ten

At Network Ten

No mainstream digital disrupter, such as Twitter, Facebook or Google, has been able to achieve its market presence without the use of traditional media. Rather than seeing digital as distinct to traditional, marketers need to view these tools as the means to achieve business goals.

RMIT

Celebrating 25 years of RMIT’s School of Economics, Finance and Marketing

By | Advice for Businesses, News | No Comments

As a member of RMIT’s Business Advisory Council I was invited to the celebrations commemorating 25 years of the School of Economics, Finance and Marketing.

The event discussed the origins of the school, which was initially formed as the School of Economics and Finance, with the addition of Marketing celebrating its ten year anniversary.

The School continues to develop through its local campus and an international presence across Singapore and Vietnam.

Exploring the customer experience through the marketing mix

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Government | No Comments

Last time we explored the current buzz around the term customer experience. While it is positive to see an emphasis on the customer perspective, in reality this concept is nothing new and is a rehash of the original marketing mix.

While the marketing mix is fundamental to the discipline, it is often an area that many businesses fail to get right, partly due to the dilution of what customer experience actually means.

A successful experience is where all elements of the marketing mix provide consistency, instils confidence in the purchase decision, and mitigates doubt. The marketing mix helps ensure that all aspects of your organisation, from back-end processes through to front-end communications reinforce your value proposition.

The Marketing Mix (otherwise known as the 7Ps of Marketing)

The Marketing Mix demonstrates the intended breadth of marketing:

  • Pricing should be consistent with the value proposition.
  • Distribution channels or placement reflects this positioning,
  • Provision of physical evidence to demonstrate outcomes.
  • Internal processes should facilitate the engagement of customers.
  • Promotion and communications needs to reflect the value proposition to reach the intended target markets.
  • The actual products or services should be designed inline with customer requirements.
  • The people and personnel should reinforce the image of the business and the core value of the brands it provides.

While the Marketing Mix is the cornerstone of marketing, many marketing managers do not have the required visibility or influence across each of these areas. As a result there is a the potential risk of inconsistency, which can tarnish reputations and diminish customer reach.

Kiki K – an example in the marketing mix:

Kikki K is a brand that designs and sells stationery, consistent with Swedish design principles. It challenges its customers to utilise stationery to create the life they want. Ultimately it uses these aspirations to position stationery as the creator of these dreams.

Kikki K’s stores reflect this aesthetic and this is continued through its digital presence, print collateral and the attitude of the staff. The customer experience is further emphasised by Kikki K conducting events that aim to inspire its target markets through the achievement of dreasms.

The business has created a successful stationery brand with a premium pricing model, despite the commoditisation of the sector through competitors such as Officeworks. The reason this works is due to an approach that provides consistency across the marketing mix. Kikki K has a clearly defined target market and has positioned each element of the marketing mix to reinforce this experience.

2015-09-25 Kikki K Store

And another example:

Contrast this to another example: Telstra, which in recent years has been trying to win the hearts and minds of Australians through interconnectedness and personalisation. While its public communications are promoting a friendly and approachable business, this is often not consistent with the experience customers receive through Telstra’s support systems or retail outlets. While Telstra is fortunate to leverage its history as a regulated entity, most other businesses are not so lucky and would suffer reputational risk and loss of market share due to this lack of integration.

Marketing is holistic

Effective marketing achieves outcomes because it is more than just front-end communications. Real marketing undertakes a holistic approach to deliver consistency and confidence throughout the entire customer journey.

Early Childhood Management Services Annual General Meeting

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Early Childhood Management Services (ECMS) is a not-for-profit organisation and Victoria’s largest provider of early education and care for children. ECMS is one of our valued clients and we have worked closely with them in developing their marketing presence.

Tonight we attended the ECMS Annual General Meeting, providing a reflection on their achievements over 2014 and a focus on their future direction. Every not-for-profit organisation needs to hold an AGM and to produce an Annual Report. Rather than being considered as a regulatory requirement, these activities should be seen as key marketing tools.

This year ECMS produced an online Annual Report, providing insights into the reach of their services, as well as the impact they create through their work in early education and care. The Annual Report was supported through their Annual General Meeting, which involved key partners to further reinforce the strategic direction of the organisation.

Collaborative partners, funding bodies and other stakeholders will often request copies of an Annual Report. Utilising the report as an opportunity to convey your narrative and impact provides the ability to better engage with these stakeholders.

The work undertaken by ECMS in creating their online Annual Report platform demonstrates how a not-for-profit organisation can reinforce their impact in the community.

The ECMS Annual Report for 2014 is available from www.ecms.org.au/annualreport2014