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media presence Archives - Syneka Marketing

From experience into engagement – how do we measure outcomes?

By | Advice for Businesses, Resources | No Comments

Last week, we featured feedback from Janet of Port Places, highlighting how the Royal Botanical Garden was utilising Twitter to manage experiences around TitanArum, one of its key exhibits.

This week Walter from Kinship, has offered his views, particularly in the need to link the social media presence to broader outcomes:

  1. What now happens to the Twitter feed – it has to be managed into a coma or in some way resources directed to it to manage it while the flower is dead.
  2. What happens to the followers of the flower? Are they now encouraged to move to @RBG_Melbourne – are they the same, are they different – what resources now need to be put into maintaining a relationship with the flower followers?

The better alternative would have been to simply use a #titanarum hashtag on the main feed which would have avoided all these issues and maintained continuity with the subscriber base with no extra effort.

People always have bright ideas about starting new campaigns, but rarely think about what happens after the campaign and how the results will be harvested and relationships continued.

Walter raises some valid points. Firstly, there is a need to understand the desired outcomes from the campaign. One aspect is engagement over TitanArum, but the broader focus should be on fostering ongoing interest and participation with the Royal Botanical Gardens. As a result, there is a need to measure conversions between followers of @TitanArum through to @RBG_Melbourne. Secondly how many of these become attendees of the Gardens, or promote the activities more broadly? Furthermore, how many commit to a membership or ongoing participation?

Following a theme or campaign is often the first stage to broader engagement and should not be seen as the end result.

Walter’s comments provide a brilliant introduction to the theme we will be exploring this month. Specifically, how you should be measuring marketing outcomes.

Being Strategic

Being Strategic Through Marketing

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

In February, through our blogging and social media presence, we covered the need for businesses to be strategic.

We began by looking at the SWOT analysis. We discussed the importance of using this tool to draw insights about your business. We followed this by explaining some case studies that demonstrated where marketers have used insights to deliver campaigns that effectively reach their target market.

We ended the month by going back to the basics and discussed the need to redefine marketing. A professional marketer can provide you with the right strategies to grow your business and this drives our passion to redefine marketing.

In March we will be covering the topic of transforming plans into action. Stay tuned for more from our video series.

Viral Marketing - It's All About Context

Viral Marketing – It’s All About Context

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Over the weekend I was catching up on some YouTube only to be confronted with an odd and rather creepy advertisement from Sportsbet entitled “50 Shades of Greyhound”. Designed as a parody of the trailer for the movie “50 Shades of Grey” the ad parodied the original trailer with a twist, having the male protagonist depicted by a greyhound.

In the span of a week, this ad has already amassed over 300,000 views on YouTube. The video has over 10,000 likes on Facebook and has been shared just under 5,000 times.

A rather different looking Mr Grey

A rather different looking Mr Grey

Viral marketing has gained increased precedence amongst well known brands who want to connect with a younger audience. Brands such as Old Spice, Air New Zealand and Metro Trains have been able to gain world wide awareness and recognition through viral marketing. While the impact of some viral campaigns have been questionable, we believe that the most important thing for a viral campaign is its context.

Personally, I found the Sportsbet 50 Shades of Greyhound ad in bad taste. However I can see their context.

The betting market is a mature and competitive industry with many players. While many individuals who engage in betting and gambling are over 50, there is a growing demographic engaging in online gambling between the ages of 18 to 29. Viral videos and an active social media presence are an effective way of reaching this demographic.

Looking at the social media pages for Sportsbet, they have just under 500,000 likes on Facebook, 98,000 followers on Twitter and over 4,000 subscribers on YouTube. Their content is clearly cutting through to their target markets.

Past campaigns have included parodies of television shows such as Wife Swap and Game of Thrones. They have also taken to making fun of their own customers during the cricket and spring carnival seasons through advertisements depicting various customer segments as “bogan”, the “handholder” and the “International”.

In creating this “lad-like” content, Sportsbet has been able to personify itself as a mate to its younger demographic, breaking boundaries and creating engagement.

50 Shades of Greyhound has been designed for those young men, who may have been forced to watch 50 Shades of Grey with their partner. It also attracts the attention of those questioning the significance of this movie. It is an impossible situation that makes a cheeky link back to its offering.

While I clearly did not enjoy it, I can see young men around the country discussing this advertisement, looking at their phones and checking for the next greyhound race!

Inside Small Business

Inside Small Business: Success Starts With a Marketing Plan

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses | 2 Comments

Syneka Marketing is featured in the April edition of Inside Small Business, where we discuss the importance of
marketing plans
and why they are essential for businesses.

Every viable business needs a marketing plan. A
marketing plan
shows you how to achieve the goals you have set to grow and develop your business.

Marketing is one of the most misunderstood words in business. Marketing is more than sales, advertising, logos, promotion or processes – it is about leveraging these tactics to achieve your goals.


Marketing starts with strategy
. A marketing plan considers your business and sets goals that are realistic and achievable. Marketing lets you identify new opportunities, as well as grow revenue. A marketing plan identifies potential target markets and the best methods to reach these customers. Once you understand your potential customers,
the plan
will identify what tasks need to be undertaken, the budget for these activities and the outcomes to measure success.

A new logo, brochure or social-media presence is not marketing. Marketing is when the logo is used to create a brand, providing an identity that can be reinforced with brochures, websites or Twitter accounts. Marketing is created through the strategy that identifies the right communication channels, messages and visual identity to reach your target markets.

Marketing also considers how you can scale your processes and operations to accommodate future growth. There is little merit in starting a new sales campaign if you are unable to respond to these potential customers. Ensure that staff can accommodate new demand and can assist potential customers who may be unfamiliar with your products and services.

Marketing activities must be measurable and a marketing plan allows you set the outcomes you want to achieve. For example, if it recommends that a brochure reaches your target market, then the response that it generates must be measured. Likewise, measure how people navigate through your website and the items that generate the most interest. If something doesn’t work then you have the option of refining these activities to achieve the outcomes you want.

A marketing plan creates a positive return on investment so you can achieve revenue growth. Before spending money on marketing or sales, make sure you have a marketing plan that shows you how you can achieve your goals and grow your business.

Eastern Volunteers

Training Workshop – Online Marketing and Social Media

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

This morning I hosted an online marketing workshop in partnership with Eastern Volunteers, providing advice on using online forms of marketing for not-for-profit organisations.

The workshop covered the theory and practical elements of online marketing, discussing the fundamentals for successful engagement, while guiding participants through the use of several tools, including Facebook, Twitter and HootSuite.

Websites, and social marketing tools, need to be considered as a form of marketing. Organisations need to understand who they want to reach and why. Unfortunately many organisations jump into social media, without a marketing strategy that considers how their online presence supports their brand.

Websites need to be maintained and kept up-to-date to show that your organisation is relevant. Similarly a social media presence with very little activity, will provide a detrimental effect and will fail to encourage wider engagement. Integrating social media tools with a website can assist in reducing the time required to add content, meaning there is more time to curate and foster communities.

Furthermore, it is important that organisations have robust media and communication policies that incorporate the usage of social media. These policies should be readily available, so that all stakeholders are aware of what is considered as acceptable use for social media. Organisations should attempt to engage people with negative comments and resolve difficulties offline, while offensive items should be removed immediately.

Online marketing, supported by the effective use social media, has the potential to increase the reach of an organisation, but it needs to be supported with the right strategies.

Thank you to the participants who attended the workshop and for discussing your online marketing needs.

Reflections on starting a new business – The challenges and opportunities

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses | 2 Comments

The 19th of October was Support Small Business Day. Over the past week we’ve been sharing advice for small businesses, through our social media presence on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn.

Syneka Marketing was founded in 2009 and while our core business remains strategic marketing, we also offer creative and online solutions to complement our service delivery.

Support Small Business Day provided an opportunity for reflection on starting a relatively new business. The greatest challenge for any new business is when the owner decides to take the plunge and work on their new venture full-time.

There is never an opportune moment to make this decision, as it means leaving the stability of paid employment to venture into the unknown. A business owner, however needs to balance the time required to maintain current projects, as well as to build future sales. If you find yourself not having sufficient time to build a sales pipeline due to work volume, then it is time to consider working on your business full-time.

Begin your business with a solid foundation

Begin your business with a solid foundation

As a business owner it is imperative that sufficient time is allocated to creating new opportunities and sales. If these tasks are not being undertaken then it will jeopardise the future viability of your business.

While there may be short-term challenges in leaving secure employment, it will ensure that you can dedicate time to growing your business.

Time management can also be a challenge. You need to be able to set your own tasks and motivate your performance. Keep a list of the tasks that need to be undertaken and ensure that they are completed in a timely manner. Working on your own business needs to be treated the same way as working for someone else. Establish working hours and ensure ongoing performance measurement and review.

Uncertainty, is another significant challenge and this is why it is important to allocate time to generating new opportunities. Planning is essential to combat business uncertainty. Business and marketing plans should be considered essential documents. While it is easy to get caught up in the excitement of starting a new business, sound planning will ensure that you have a successful framework and the ability to measure outcomes.

According to data sourced through the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), poor strategic management has been identified as a cause for approximately 43% of all  business failures. Starting a new business is challenging, but sound planning can reduce uncertainty and help deliver a viable future.