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media policies Archives - Syneka Marketing

Social Media Workshop with Leadership Great South Coast

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Leadership Great South Coast is an annual leadership program provided to 25 emerging leaders from within the business, community and government sectors.  I was invited to workshop the social media component of the program.

Alex presenting at the Great South Leadership Conference

Alex presenting at the Great South Leadership Conference

Social media is used increasingly within both a personal and professional capacity. It is important for emerging leaders to have an understanding of social media and its use as an interactive communication medium.

The workshop was held in Port Fairy. I discussed several social media tools, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google+ and others.  Like any communication tool, each social media platform has its own strengths and demographics. LinkedIn, for example, is extremely useful in reaching professional networks, while Pinterest can work well for retail, fashion through the visual representation of content.

Social media is a communication platform that is used in a personal and professional capacity. It is possible to hide content but online privacy is not always guaranteed. It is always better to not share questionable content, rather than to risk it being found by employers or others. Inappropriate content  may adversely affect your reputation or that of your business or organisation.

The Port Fairy Community Services Centre

The Port Fairy Community Services Centre

Similarly, there is a need to manage a social media presence on an ongoing basis.  Social media needs to be kept up-to-date with new content, otherwise its effectiveness is hampered.  The Australian Advertising Standards Board (ASB) has recently ruled that an organisation is responsible for all content on its Facebook page, including items posted by other users.  The ruling was supported by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and requires organisations and businesses to actively manage and curate the content on their pages.

The lighthouse at Port Fairy on Griffiths Island

The lighthouse at Port Fairy on Griffiths Island

It is also important to have effective policies that can stimulate and manage discussion on social media. Organisations need to deal effectively with negative comments, taking the time to understand and transform negativity, while promptly removing offensive remarks.  Social media policies should be readily accessible to ensure that all contributors are clear on acceptable usage.

Port Fairy is an extremely picturesque town and it was fantastic to be able to share my social media experiences with aspiring leaders.

I was the first elected Councillor in Australia to utilise blogging along with social media as a communications tool. It is inspiring to be able to share this knowledge with emerging leaders.

 

Third Sector Magazine: Activate your community through social media

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Third Sector Magazine has published our advice on engaging communities through social media. Alex will be discussing social media as a speaker at the Third Sector Expo on Monday the 15th of April, for details please visit www.thirdsectorevents.com.au.

The website Humanities 21 which is integrated with Facebook, Twitter and other social media tools

The website Humanities 21 which is integrated with Facebook, Twitter and other social media tools

Activate your community through social media

Is your organisation considering social media, but not sure where to start? Or has it recently created a Facebook page and Twitter feed only to be underwhelmed by the results? Syneka Marketing provides seven tips to help your organisation strengthen its social media presence and re-engage its communities online.

Know where to start

Social media is the collective name for a range of tools that enhance interactivity and discussion, such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ and Pinterest. Each of these tools has a slightly different purpose and audience, but they are all designed to encourage participation.

Know what you want to achieve

Success begins with strategy and this is no different for social media. Decide the specific outcomes you want to achieve from your social media efforts, such as:

  • Raising awareness
  • Encouraging volunteers
  • Increasing donations.

Once you know what you want to achieve, you can consider the messages and tools that can be used to promote these objectives.

Develop a social media policy

Social media policies help to identify the people who will have access to social media accounts and will be authorised to provide official announcements. Other individuals can respond to comments and interact, as well as support the authorised spokespeople.

Policies should enable board members, staff and volunteers to support the organisation’s social media presence.

Each social media tool has its own audience and key strengths.

Each social media tool has its own audience and key strengths.

Engage and interact

When creating a new social media account, encourage your members or supporters to follow your organisation. In addition, promote your social media presence through your website, newsletter and other communication tools. Undertaking initial promotion will ensure that you can build a network of followers that will assist in promoting your organisation. Follow similar organisations and encourage them to follow you.

Handle negativity

Negative comments should hopefully be kept to a minimum, but it’s important to have clear guidelines to manage any adverse commentary.

Make a clear distinction between negative and offensive comments and respond accordingly. Aim to engage directly with someone that has written a negative comment and suggest that you would like to follow up further. Try and engage the person through offline forms of contact, such as the telephone, so that you can discuss their concerns directly. Attempting to resolve the issue outside of the public realm will enable a more in-depth discussion.

If a comment is deemed to be offensive, it should be removed immediately as per your media and communications policy.

Integrate online tools

One of the great aspects of the web and social media is that messages can be integrated. You can automatically post updates from your website through to Facebook, Twitter and other social media tools. Integration ensures a consistent message while saving time by replicating content across your networks.

Integrating social media means you’ll have more time to foster and develop your community by providing a base level of communications.

Share content

Re-tweeting or sharing posts on Facebook indicates that the person supports your organisation and messages. The sharing of content is the online equivalent of word of mouth advertising and is a great way to extend your organisation’s networks.

Social media, like a website, needs to be kept up-to-date. An inactive presence is worse than having no presence, as the first question someone will ask is whether the organisation still exists.

GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector – Day One

By | Advice, Government, Presentations, Resources | One Comment
Day One of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

Day One of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector is a two day conference held in Sydney.   The first day looked at how to plan social media campaigns, drawing on examples at a local and state and federal level.

I was asked to chair the conference and also provided a presentation exploring the use of social media as an advocacy tool.  The presentation drew upon my experiences in Maroondah City Council and my use of social media to advocate for the redevelopment of Ringwood Station into a safe and accessible transport interchange.

Maroondah City Council did not have social media policies at the time, despite its potential in providing direct communications from the council.  As a result I utilized my own social media networks, including Facebook, Twitter and Youtube to extend the reach of our advocacy campaign.

My Mayoral year in 2010 coincided with the State Election, providing an opportunity to advocate for the much needed replacement of Ringwood Station.  The station fails to meet accessibility standards and its outdated design leads to perceptions of poor safety and a lack of integration with key facilities within Ringwood.

As an outer eastern municipality, Maroondah’s advocacy needed to be noticed by the community, media, local MPs and the the political parties.  We needed to be able to reach the community to demonstrate widespread support for the redevelopment, the media to raise awareness, as well as local MPs and the political parties to generate results.

The campaign led to commitments from each of the major parties, including the redevelopment of Ringwood Station from 2014 by the current Government.

The advocacy campaign was successful due to the use of several communication tools. Social media supported the campaign by encouraging community participation and dialogue, by sharing experiences at Ringwood Station.  We were able to use this dialogue to encourage ongoing media interest and to gather signatures for a petition calling for action.

The advocacy campaign generated sufficient momentum to be supported by the local MPs and candidates, who in turn pushed their parties to provide commitments.  Ultimately the campaign was successful due to the community focus and the use of social media to generate ongoing interest.