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measure Archives - Syneka Marketing

Redefining marketing for Associations: Tuesday 5th July

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations | No Comments

The Associations Forum aims to encourage best practice for associations to foster good governance within the sector. Last year I was invited to conduct a workshop for members of the Forum, exploring the role of marketing within associations.

This year I will be presenting a plenary session on the role of marketing at the 2016 Associations Forum National Conference. This session will explore the role of marketing within associations, identifying the need for good marketing governance and defined how outcomes can be measured through a strategic approach.

The Associations Forum National Conference will be held at the Melbourne Exhibition and Convention Centre, Redefining Marketing: Metrics and Marketing Performance for Associations is a plenary session opening the conference on Tuesday the 5th of July.

For details visit afnc.associations.net.au

We are redefining marketing – hear us speak at two upcoming events

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Resources | No Comments

Our vision is to redefine marketing and we do this by delivering measurable and accountable marketing outcomes through the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .
Throughout June we will be presenting at several key events to highlight the role of marketing and the need for marketing to step up and deliver outcomes that reinforce organisational goals.

Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

On Wednesday the 8th of June we will be hosting Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance, a feature webinar hosted by ProBono Australia.

Not-for-profit organisations are facing immense pressure to become market responsive and yet marketing remains widely misunderstood in the not-for-profit sector.
This one hour webinar will assist not-for-profit organisations in developing a strategic approach to marketing. We will explore the sequencing and touchpoints required to enhance the stakeholder experience and explore the framework required to instill effective marketing governance and accountabilities.

Attend this session to ensure an alignment between marketing outcomes and organisational goals and generate a positive return from marketing resources.

Register through EventBrite to attend this session for Wednesday the 8th of June at 2pm. Pricing is $55 for individuals and $300 for organisations (with unlimited staff access).

The Business Seesaw at the Melbourne Brekkie Club

On Thursday the 9th of June we will be presenting at the Very Melbourne Brekkie Club, through the Melbourne Business Network in a collaboration with Paul Ostaff, from our management consulting partner, Reignite Consulting.

Join us as we discuss the Business Seesaw, as we explore the infrastructure required for businesses to build their operational and marketing capacity. Many businesses struggle to balance the need for business growth through marketing and service. Reignite Consulting and Syneka Marketing will be outlining our framework for businesses to achieve operational and marketing excellence.

Details and registration is available via EventBrite and is open to members of the Melbourne Business Network.

Marketing Governance: Mitigating reputational and financial risks

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Good governance needs to underpin all aspects of a business or organisation and this holds true for marketing. Unfortunately, marketing governance tends to be substantially underdeveloped, with blurred responsibilities and a lack of sufficient oversight.

The most evident examples are seen in social media, where a lack of oversight and a failure to link execution with strategic direction, has resulted in significant public mistakes by businesses (including large businesses like Woolworths and McDonalds), as well as not-for-profit organisations (as evidenced through the failed YourTaxis campaign).

Marketing Governance defines the roles and responsibilities of the marketing function, by considering three core elements:

2016-02-29 Levels

  1. Level 1: Executive – Leadership and Direction – Marketing leadership and strategic direction needs to be established at an executive level. This is often the Chief Marketing Officer and the Executive Team, or a combination of the board and Executive Officer within not-for-profit organisations. The strategic marketing direction needs to be consistent with the organisation’s vision.  In particular, the entire marketing mix needs to be considered, to ensure that marketing has visibility and suitable influence across the organisation. Suitable structures should be developed to support the need for marketing to be integrated into other business areas.
  1. Level 2: Management – Accountability and Oversight – Management is accountable for delivering the strategies that will achieve the goals established through the marketing plan. Management should determine the appropriate activities and tactics (within budget and resource parameters) that will collectively achieve the identified direction. Management is responsible for oversight across these activities to ensure consistency and to evaluate results. Management should be empowered to not only measure marketing performance, but to adjust these activities if the expected outcomes are not being realised. As a result, management must be able to measure marketing performance and be fully aware of the customer journey and sequencing that is required to motivate action.
  1. Level 3: Implementation – Execution – Execution is where relevant marketing tactics are undertaken based on the decisions made by management. The execution layer can involve internal teams, external partners or a combined approach, but should always have a clear understanding of the outcomes required. It is imperative that execution activities are briefed correctly and that inputs and outputs are not mistaken for marketing outcomes. Management needs oversight over execution to ensure that outcomes are consistent and delivering anticipated results. Measuring marketing performance enables adjustments and to ensure that all execution elements are working as intended.

Marketing Governance is an area that is far too often overlooked, but is required to ensure the evaluation of marketing performance and to reduce reputational and financial risk.

Marketing, as a function, and organisations overall, need to develop capabilities in marketing governance so we can finally see an end to mistakes that never should have occurred in the first place, had oversight and direction been suitably established.

Complimentary Consultations to help the not-for-profit sector re-define marketing

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations | No Comments

We offered complimentary marketing consultations during the conference and it was great to see the overwhelming response, with our sessions being oversubscribed. While each organisation has its own unique challenges, common areas of focus included:

  • The need to segment stakeholders and to understand their outcomes. Many not-for-profit organisations view their end-clients as a target market, but omit the need to reach prospective volunteers, board members, government, funding organisations and others.
  • Consideration of intermediaries and partner organisations. Many not-for-profit organisations have limited budgets, meaning broadcast communications are often beyond their reach. Instead, there is a need to form partnerships and explore intermediary organisations to reach relevant stakeholders.
  • Marketing metrics are not defined, leading to lack of measurability and confusion over inputs, outputs and outcomes. Website visitations, or attendance at information sessions are inputs, donation enquiries are an output and the actual donation is the outcome. Organisations need to understand the decision making journey (customer journey) and the sequence that is required to generate action.
  • Lack of marketing governance. Roles between board, management, staff and external parties are ill-defined, hampering the ability to measure performance and establish strategic direction.

These challenges are shared by both businesses and not-for-profit organisations, demonstrating the ongoing need to re-define marketing so it returns to its core of being led by strategic insights and not by execution.

Thank you to the participants of these sessions and for the fantastic feedback we received. We hope that the attendees at the National Volunteering Conference are able to build their marketing capacity and demonstrate the value they provide.

The CEO Institute – Marketing in a business to business context

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

The CEO institute is a member based association that connects likeminded businesses to foster shared learning and professional development. Members of the CEO Institute form syndicates based on their turnover and business focus, which meet on a regular basis.

This morning I was invited to speak to one of the syndicates on the role of marketing in a business to business context. Unlike consumer products, business to business marketing often requires longer lead times and an understanding of key personnel, including influencers, users and decision makers.

Identifying the customer journey, by understanding the required touchpoints and the sequencing of activities, is critical. The workshop led participants through the role of marketing in building and facilitating this customer journey, as well as the metrics required to measure results.

Measuring Marketing Performance – Don’t confuse inputs for outputs

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Last time we explored the customer journey, returning to the decision making process, as a potential customer begins at a pre-purchase phase prior to a purchase and then post-purchase considerations. We also explored the customer experience, to ensure that the term returns to its core definition within the marketing mix.

Both of these concepts demonstrate the need for consistency, as well as multiple contact points to reach customers and influence decisions. As a result, there is a need for a holistic view of marketing, since running disparate tactics will result in diminished outcomes. Furthermore, undertaking a holistic approach enables a greater degree of confidence in decisions and the ability to measure overall impact.

Unfortunately there is a lot of misinformation in regard to the measurement of marketing performance. Firstly, offline content, such as product factsheets, print media, radio and TV can be measured and should be evaluated to understand overall performance. Secondly, many digital metrics, such as website visitations, social media interaction are in fact inputs rather than outputs.

Far too often, we see marketing managers that report on website visitations, Facebook likes or Twitter followers, without providing metrics that consider the end outcomes, namely conversions into customers or repeat purchases. The key is to use these inputs and map the contact points that are required across the customer journey to achieve the end result, such as a purchase or repeat purchase. Similarly, the customer will have differing forms of interaction with a business, beyond promotions, such as a direct interaction with staff, or a visitation into a store. Each of these aspects form part of the journey and need to be measured, as an adverse experience across any of these areas can deter purchase intent.

Begin by assessing the channels that you use to raise overall awareness and then consider the next steps that a customer takes once there is general awareness. Is your prospective customer visiting a website and then following up through email or phone, or do they undertake further research, prior to returning? Is the first point of contact a broadcast medium or referral, rather than a website?

Pre purchase purchase post purchase

Each of these components form an input into the end goal, so consider overall reach, followed by identifying customers that have taken a subsequent step along the next contact point. Benchmark and evaluate these results so you can make informed decisions on the rate of marketing return and the effects of any modifications. As a result you can identify the relevancy of website visitors, whether event participation is reaching the target audiences and overall number of contact points and timing required to achieve purchase intent.