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marketing tools Archives - Syneka Marketing

A new financial year – a new opportunity to make marketing work for you

By | Advice for Businesses | 2 Comments

Over the past six months we have been re-imagining marketing, and seeking to define the outcomes achieved through a strategic approach to marketing.

With the start of a new financial year fast approaching it is time to start thinking about your marketing and re-define the way that you do things in your business.

Marketing like Accountancy or Law is a professional service. There is a need to utilise the right expertise to provide the foundations that enable ongoing business success.

One of the ways we work with businesses is through our marketing audits. A marketing audit is a marketing health check for your business. The marketing audit assesses the effectiveness of your current marketing activities. Outcomes include an understanding of what marketing components you need to undertake to achieve ongoing success.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

 

We have led the need to embed metrics into marketing through our focus on re-imaging marketing. The marketing audit provides the framework to evaluate your marketing activities and ensure a positive return on investment.

A strategic approach to marketing takes away the guess work in terms of what marketing you need to achieve ongoing success. Marketing should not be a hit-or-miss exercise and a marketing audit will show you the mix of marketing tools that align to your business outcomes.

Early Childhood Management Services Annual General Meeting

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Early Childhood Management Services (ECMS) is a not-for-profit organisation and Victoria’s largest provider of early education and care for children. ECMS is one of our valued clients and we have worked closely with them in developing their marketing presence.

Tonight we attended the ECMS Annual General Meeting, providing a reflection on their achievements over 2014 and a focus on their future direction. Every not-for-profit organisation needs to hold an AGM and to produce an Annual Report. Rather than being considered as a regulatory requirement, these activities should be seen as key marketing tools.

This year ECMS produced an online Annual Report, providing insights into the reach of their services, as well as the impact they create through their work in early education and care. The Annual Report was supported through their Annual General Meeting, which involved key partners to further reinforce the strategic direction of the organisation.

Collaborative partners, funding bodies and other stakeholders will often request copies of an Annual Report. Utilising the report as an opportunity to convey your narrative and impact provides the ability to better engage with these stakeholders.

The work undertaken by ECMS in creating their online Annual Report platform demonstrates how a not-for-profit organisation can reinforce their impact in the community.

The ECMS Annual Report for 2014 is available from www.ecms.org.au/annualreport2014

Jean Paul Gaultier NGV

What happens when you promote something too well?

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Promotion is one facet of marketing. This Saturday I saw an excellent example of promotion at the National Gallery of Victoria. It was the last week of the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit and the gallery was open from late in the evening to midnight.

As an after dinner event with music and a party-like atmosphere it had the potential to be a great date night, mother-daugher bonding activity or family outing.

The gallery provided the option of purchasing the tickets prior to the event, which I did to avoid queues at the door.

I arrived at the National Gallery at 8pm and so did several hundred other people. Unfortunately, most of these people had also pre-purchased their tickets and I was left waiting in a line outside the gallery, then a smaller line to collect a wrist band, followed by a large line to be given access to the exhibit and then finally another smaller line waiting to make my way into the exhibition. Four lines, and more than an hour later, I finally made it to an exhibition that took two hours to see.

Line outside the National Gallery of Victoria

Line outside the National Gallery of Victoria

Had I gone to the National Gallery of Victoria at 10:30pm I would not have had that problem, but like many others I had made the decision to go there after dinner. This experience is an example of what happens when promotion goes too well.

There was a great deal of thought put into the creative collateral developed for this exhibition as well as Public Relations and digital content, however, what the National Gallery of Victoria has not done is manage the follow through effectively.

An excellent use of creative collateral

An excellent use of creative collateral

 

Inside the exhibition

Inside the exhibition

Marketing is more than promotion, it extends to the entire customer experience. From initial contact, to purchase and then interaction, the right marketing should provide a consistent experience.

My experience with the exhibition itself and the purchasing of tickets was a positive one. However having to wait in line with several hundred people was not pleasant.

So what would we recommend to provide your customers with the best possible experience?

It starts by looking at what experience you want to create, and then following this through the entire marketing process.

Marketing strategy can enable you to streamline the mix of marketing tools that create a consistent experience.

For this particular example, while the National Gallery of Victoria created a sufficient amount of excitement around the exhibition; what they did not do was create a positive overall experience. The result diminished the value I had for this particular exhibition.

This could have been avoided by doing the following: 

  • Gathering demographics about participants to gain an understanding of potential purchasing habits and behavioural patterns;
  • Streamlining viewings by staggering attendance times;
  • Notifying individuals of peak periods and estimated wait times;
  • Creating events around peak periods such as themed dinners or pre dinner exhibitions;
  • Working with other venues around the gallery to provide pre and post entertainment.

Promotion is one aspect of marketing. Creating an experience requires looking beyond this. The next time you want to promote something, avoid the trap the National Gallery of Victoria fell into with the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibition and consider promotions to be one part of your marketing mix.

Deliver Results through Marketing Implementation

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Government, News | No Comments

Marketing implementation is the ongoing execution of your marketing activities. This phase should only be undertaken once you have completed your marketing plan, as this will identify what types of marketing will be most effective for your business.

The first stage when executing any marketing activities, is the development of an implementation schedule.

Develop a schedule of when tasks need to be completed and work backwards to identify when they should commence. Identify which activities are dependent on others, so that tasks are able to be completed as required. For example, a brand and visual identity will be required before developing brochures or a website. Developing a brochure without a brand will result in diminished outcomes.

Marketing implementation can take many forms and ultimately depends on your products or services, your target markets and your available resources. Branding, logos, media engagement, websites, business development and the sales process are all aspects that should be considered as part of marketing implementation. Each of these marketing tools will influence purchase decisions and your target markets, so your marketing plan should be used as a guide to ensure consistency and relevancy.

The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities. The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities.

Marketing implementation will often require the ability to work on multiple tasks simultaneously. Some tasks, such as attending networking events or workshop sessions, may be ongoing and you will need to manage these activities while working on other items.

Most of the identified marketing activities should be interconnected, so you can develop a consistent approach and leverage each outcome. Interconnectedness will strengthen your overall marketing messages, since each activity should reinforce the value proposition you identified in your marketing plan. Ensuring a consistent approach you enable you to develop a narrative that clearly articulates your value proposition and the outcomes you provide.

Your marketing plan will also assist in being able to measure results. Consider the purpose of each marketing activity, who it is that you want to reach, how you will reach them and what outcomes you are anticipating. All forms of marketing can be measured, including offline methods. Consider the use of tracking codes, or specific telephone numbers to measure the effectiveness of brochures and leaflets.  Also remember that often a customer will require a number of contact points before responding, gain an understanding of which tools and messages resonated with them.

A strategic approach to marketing implementation, through the marketing planning process, prevents a hit or miss approach to marketing. Ultimately this saves you money and time because you have a clear understanding of what is required to achieve your business goals.

Announcing our Marketing for Success Workshop: Thursday 23rd October

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government | No Comments

With just approximately three months until 2015, now is the time to start planning ahead for 2015.

To assist you with your marketing initiatives for the new year, we are pleased to announce our half day workshop, Marketing for Success in 2015 to be held on Thursday the 23rd of October.

This exclusive workshop is limited to just six participants to ensure you have the opportunity to discuss and develop a marketing action plan that will guide your success for the new year.

Facilitation will be led by Alex Makin, as Managing Director and Founder of Syneka Marketing. Topics include strategies for success, including the development of value propositions, key messages and utilising the right marketing tools to reach your customers and increase sales.

Marketing for Success will be held from 9.30am to 1.30pm at our headoffice at 204 Bank Street, South Melbourne. All participants will receive comprehensive workshop notes, access to our online marketing self assessment (valued at $550), as well as morning tea, lunch and optional parking.

Marketing for Success is normally valued at $600, but is just $440 if you register before 30th September. Places are strictly limited to six attendees, so register now to take advantage of the early bird special and to secure your attendance.

Register Now to attend Marketing for Success

Marketing should not be viewed as a do-it-yourself exercise

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Every business needs marketing. Whether you are a large corporate, small business or start-up, the right marketing can help you to achieve your goals.

Our biggest competitor in the small and medium business space is not other marketing agencies, but rather, business owners who undertake do-it-yourself marketing.

Marketing should not be viewed as a hit-or-miss exercise

Marketing should not be viewed as a hit-or-miss exercise

Marketing is a professional service. If business owners applied a do-it-yourself mentality when undertaking finance or writing a legal contract, they would encounter problems.

More often than not, from our experience, do-it-yourself marketing, tends to involve guesswork on the part of the business owner.

The reason we believe that many business owners undertake their own marketing is that many marketing tools such as, social media and websites are easy to access and can be done at low cost.

There is also the mentality that marketing is a hit-or-miss exercise.

As a strategic marketing agency we develop marketing strategies that can take away the guesswork from deciding which marketing tools are best for your business. This not only save business owners time and money, but ensures they have the assurances that the marketing tools they use will help them grow their business.

Our marketing strategies are developed in consultation with the business owner during this process to ensure that their concerns, expertise and goals are met when developing the final marketing plan.

With three quarters of businesses failing within the first five years, having a marketing strategy may mean the difference between success and failure. If you are a small or new business, don’t leave your marketing to chance. A professional marketing strategy will enable you to achieve your goals.