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Deliver Results through Marketing Implementation

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Government, News | No Comments

Marketing implementation is the ongoing execution of your marketing activities. This phase should only be undertaken once you have completed your marketing plan, as this will identify what types of marketing will be most effective for your business.

The first stage when executing any marketing activities, is the development of an implementation schedule.

Develop a schedule of when tasks need to be completed and work backwards to identify when they should commence. Identify which activities are dependent on others, so that tasks are able to be completed as required. For example, a brand and visual identity will be required before developing brochures or a website. Developing a brochure without a brand will result in diminished outcomes.

Marketing implementation can take many forms and ultimately depends on your products or services, your target markets and your available resources. Branding, logos, media engagement, websites, business development and the sales process are all aspects that should be considered as part of marketing implementation. Each of these marketing tools will influence purchase decisions and your target markets, so your marketing plan should be used as a guide to ensure consistency and relevancy.

The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities. The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities.

Marketing implementation will often require the ability to work on multiple tasks simultaneously. Some tasks, such as attending networking events or workshop sessions, may be ongoing and you will need to manage these activities while working on other items.

Most of the identified marketing activities should be interconnected, so you can develop a consistent approach and leverage each outcome. Interconnectedness will strengthen your overall marketing messages, since each activity should reinforce the value proposition you identified in your marketing plan. Ensuring a consistent approach you enable you to develop a narrative that clearly articulates your value proposition and the outcomes you provide.

Your marketing plan will also assist in being able to measure results. Consider the purpose of each marketing activity, who it is that you want to reach, how you will reach them and what outcomes you are anticipating. All forms of marketing can be measured, including offline methods. Consider the use of tracking codes, or specific telephone numbers to measure the effectiveness of brochures and leaflets.  Also remember that often a customer will require a number of contact points before responding, gain an understanding of which tools and messages resonated with them.

A strategic approach to marketing implementation, through the marketing planning process, prevents a hit or miss approach to marketing. Ultimately this saves you money and time because you have a clear understanding of what is required to achieve your business goals.

Let’s give marketing a definition

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Presentations | No Comments

As we’ve discussed previously, one of the fundamental challenges with marketing is the lack of definition. There is a need to define marketing so it can provide a clearly articulated role within businesses and not-for-profit organisations.

Unfortunately the term marketing has been hijacked by service providers that do not provide a holistic approach. Individual components, like graphic design, logos, social media, telesales and websites do not deliver marketing.

These are individual elements that can become a form of marketing, if there is a strategic plan that integrates key messages, appearance and calls to action.

Neglecting to develop a strategic marketing plan will result in a hit or miss approach with marketing. While, some of it may work, there will be diminished outcomes, due to the lack of a cohesive approach.

We’re aiming to redefine marketing so its strategic merits are understood and appreciated. This is why we’ve introducing a series of eBooks, with our first topic exploring the definition and role of marketing.

What is Marketing?‘ explores the elements of marketing and discusses how these combine into a cohesive strategy. The eBook includes worksheet based questions to develop a practical application of the key concepts.

We are offering ‘What is Marketing?‘ as a free resource to help guide the discussion and definition of marketing, and prevent the hit and miss approach that we see far too often in businesses and not-for-profit organisations.

We will be releasing further eBooks identifying specific areas of marketing, that we believe need clarification and support. We are happy to take your suggestions on topic you would like covered. Email us at alex@synekamarketing.com.au and let us know your thoughts.

‘What is Marketing?’ is a free eBook available for downloading from our eBook Portal.

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Inside Small Business

Inside Small Business: Success Starts With a Marketing Plan

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses | 2 Comments

Syneka Marketing is featured in the April edition of Inside Small Business, where we discuss the importance of
marketing plans
and why they are essential for businesses.

Every viable business needs a marketing plan. A
marketing plan
shows you how to achieve the goals you have set to grow and develop your business.

Marketing is one of the most misunderstood words in business. Marketing is more than sales, advertising, logos, promotion or processes – it is about leveraging these tactics to achieve your goals.


Marketing starts with strategy
. A marketing plan considers your business and sets goals that are realistic and achievable. Marketing lets you identify new opportunities, as well as grow revenue. A marketing plan identifies potential target markets and the best methods to reach these customers. Once you understand your potential customers,
the plan
will identify what tasks need to be undertaken, the budget for these activities and the outcomes to measure success.

A new logo, brochure or social-media presence is not marketing. Marketing is when the logo is used to create a brand, providing an identity that can be reinforced with brochures, websites or Twitter accounts. Marketing is created through the strategy that identifies the right communication channels, messages and visual identity to reach your target markets.

Marketing also considers how you can scale your processes and operations to accommodate future growth. There is little merit in starting a new sales campaign if you are unable to respond to these potential customers. Ensure that staff can accommodate new demand and can assist potential customers who may be unfamiliar with your products and services.

Marketing activities must be measurable and a marketing plan allows you set the outcomes you want to achieve. For example, if it recommends that a brochure reaches your target market, then the response that it generates must be measured. Likewise, measure how people navigate through your website and the items that generate the most interest. If something doesn’t work then you have the option of refining these activities to achieve the outcomes you want.

A marketing plan creates a positive return on investment so you can achieve revenue growth. Before spending money on marketing or sales, make sure you have a marketing plan that shows you how you can achieve your goals and grow your business.

What is Marketing?

What is Marketing?

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations | 7 Comments

Marketing is unfortunately one of the most misunderstood functions in businesses and organisations. Professional Marketers have unfortunately allowed the term to be hijacked – through telemarketing, direct marketing, SEO marketing – and by others, who claim to offer marketing, but without the foundations to ensure ongoing success.

Marketing is created when you leverage the tools you have to achieve your organisation's goals

Marketing is created when you leverage the tools you have to achieve your organisation’s goals

The definition

Marketing has no standard definition – the key terms even differ between professional marketing associations.

The American Marketing Association defines marketing as:

Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.

While the Australian Marketing Institute uses the following definition:

Marketing creates value – for customers, shareholders and society as a whole. It does this by creating an alignment between what consumers value and what organisations offer. It offers techniques that help firms better understand the needs, preferences and perceptions of their customers (a prerequisite to adding value to them), and ways of using that understanding to focus the value-creating and communicating activities of the firm into areas where they will be most effective.

While the definitions differ, there is the common element of value, ensuring organisations provide value that resonates with customers, clients and other stakeholders.

Marketing – more than the sum of the parts

Marketing is more than sales, advertising, logos, promotion or processes – it is about leveraging the combined effort of your business or organisation to achieve its goals and mission.

Marketing starts with strategy. It considers the capabilities of your organisation and assesses the wider operating context to outline the steps required to achieve the goals you want for your organisation.

A marketing plan works in tandem with your business plan, providing the context and identifying steps that are required. A business plan identifies what you want to achieve, a marketing plan shows how you achieve these outcomes.

A logo on its own is not marketing, nor is a brochure, website or Twitter account. Marketing is when the logo is used to create a brand, providing an identity that is used in a brochure, website or Twitter account to communicate messages that reach and resonate with a target audience.

Marketing is when you leverage each of these tools to achieve the goals you have set for your organisation.

Beware the Pretenders

There are unfortunately many operators who are nothing more than pretenders – hijacking the marketing term through promises that cannot be kept.

You can use more than one provider to draw on specific expertise, but each of them should understand your goals and how they fit into the bigger picture. Services that neglect the bigger picture will do more harm than good, offering suggestions that fail to understand the people, processes and strengths of your organisation.

The consequences

Failing to understand the bigger picture can harm the reputation of your organisation, by creating conflicting messages that erode the value of your brand.

Let’s consider a brand likes Porsche. If Porsche wanted to increase sales then one option would be aggressive price discounts. Reducing prices would most likely result in a short-term increase in sales, but would also erode the prestige that Porsche has established over many years. The end result would be conflicting messages and an eroded brand that would adversely impact sales and reputation into the future.

A holistic marketing approach would understand the strengths of the brand and provide strategies that do not erode an organisation’s value.

Retail is experiencing a similar issue in Australia, where the focus has been on price rather than service.

There was a time when shoppers travelled to Myer to experience its highly regarded levels of service. Over time a focus on reducing prices resulted in staff reductions and a lower level of service, making Myer just another department store.

Along came online stores, who can undercut traditional retailers because they do not have the same cost pressures.

Unfortunately, retailers have focused predominately on price, without leveraging the strengths provided by a store presence. The result is an erosion of their unique selling proposition, or the attributes that distinguish one organisation from another. Retail needs to focus on the experience: service, personalisation and where shoppers are able to see what they want to buy.

Don’t damage your brand

While a standard definition of marketing is unlikely to be agreed upon soon – it is time to recapture what marketing is and the value it provides.

Don’t risk your organisation with providers who fail to understand the bigger picture and do not provide the steps to get you there.

Success starts with strategy – know what you want to achieve and then plan the steps required to get you there.