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NGV Members Summer Party – Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Syneka Marketing is a proud patron of the arts and we are a supporter of the National Gallery of Victoria, through membership and event participation.

Each year the National Gallery of Victoria hosts its Summer Party, highlighting its current exhibition and providing a lively atmosphere, through music and festivities. This year, the Summer Party coincided with the premier exhibition featuring Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei.

Andy Warhol, as a leading figure in pop art, blurred the lines between celebrity and artist, using a combination of mediums to convey his artist intent. Andy Warhol had a background in commercial illustration and advertising, which carried through to his artistic work where he often explored the impact of icons.

Andy Warhol's Campbell's Soup Cans (1962)

Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962)

Ai Weiwei extends many of Andy Warhol’s concepts, juxtaposing modern icons with a political overlay and historic context. In particular, Ai Weiwei has extended the interaction between artist and community, incorporating active social media engagement, while maintaining a focus on human rights.

The Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei exhibition demonstrates the evolving nature of art. The National Gallery of Victoria’s Summer Party was the ideal occasion to see the unfolding narrative of these works.

The Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei Exhibition concludes on the 24th of April.

Measuring Marketing Performance – Don’t confuse inputs for outputs

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Last time we explored the customer journey, returning to the decision making process, as a potential customer begins at a pre-purchase phase prior to a purchase and then post-purchase considerations. We also explored the customer experience, to ensure that the term returns to its core definition within the marketing mix.

Both of these concepts demonstrate the need for consistency, as well as multiple contact points to reach customers and influence decisions. As a result, there is a need for a holistic view of marketing, since running disparate tactics will result in diminished outcomes. Furthermore, undertaking a holistic approach enables a greater degree of confidence in decisions and the ability to measure overall impact.

Unfortunately there is a lot of misinformation in regard to the measurement of marketing performance. Firstly, offline content, such as product factsheets, print media, radio and TV can be measured and should be evaluated to understand overall performance. Secondly, many digital metrics, such as website visitations, social media interaction are in fact inputs rather than outputs.

Far too often, we see marketing managers that report on website visitations, Facebook likes or Twitter followers, without providing metrics that consider the end outcomes, namely conversions into customers or repeat purchases. The key is to use these inputs and map the contact points that are required across the customer journey to achieve the end result, such as a purchase or repeat purchase. Similarly, the customer will have differing forms of interaction with a business, beyond promotions, such as a direct interaction with staff, or a visitation into a store. Each of these aspects form part of the journey and need to be measured, as an adverse experience across any of these areas can deter purchase intent.

Begin by assessing the channels that you use to raise overall awareness and then consider the next steps that a customer takes once there is general awareness. Is your prospective customer visiting a website and then following up through email or phone, or do they undertake further research, prior to returning? Is the first point of contact a broadcast medium or referral, rather than a website?

Pre purchase purchase post purchase

Each of these components form an input into the end goal, so consider overall reach, followed by identifying customers that have taken a subsequent step along the next contact point. Benchmark and evaluate these results so you can make informed decisions on the rate of marketing return and the effects of any modifications. As a result you can identify the relevancy of website visitors, whether event participation is reaching the target audiences and overall number of contact points and timing required to achieve purchase intent.

We’ve defined customer experience – now connect it to the customer journey

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Resources | No Comments

We recently discussed the need for marketing to move beyond buzzwords and to instead re-claim the definition of customer experience, which forms the very core of marketing theory. Our thoughts have now been viewed organically by over 5000 people in just 48 hours via LinkedIn, and continues to be actively being shared across key social media channels.

Interest in this article has demonstrated why marketing needs to reclaim its core remit, so today we are going to exploring another buzzword: customer journey.

In defining the customer experience, we returned to the core of marketing theory through the marketing mix. The overall customer experience is going to be defined by the impact of the impressions that are made across each of these elements.

We need to return to fundamentals to explore the customer journey, as we explore the steps that are taken for someone to become a customer and ideally remain so on an ongoing basis.

Phases in the Customer Journey

There are three interconnected phases within the customer journey:

  • Pre-purchase – where the aim is to raise awareness with your target markets and ensure that your brand is actively considered by these prospective customers.
  • The Purchase phase – where the prospect becomes a customer. This is where they commit to purchasing your product or service and the perceptions of its brand.
  • The Post-purchase phase – where your customer considers the outcomes and value they received, based on their perceptions and the outcomes that were achieved.

The three phases of the customer journey as mapped to the decision making process
The three phases of the customer journey as mapped to the decision making process.

 

The Decision Making Process has its origins in consumer behaviour stemming from the 1960s. We have adapted this model to explore each phase in the customer journey, as viewed through the decision making process. It explores both the rational (such as pricing and function) and perceptual (attitudes and subjective impressions) aspects that influence the decision.

The customer journey is not linear and this particularly true if there is a desire to build loyalty and repeat purchases. The experience you are creating through the marketing mix will impact on the ability to successfully transition your target market through the customer journey. The customer experience relates to their interaction with your business or brand, while the customer journey views this from the customer perspective as they identify the best fit for their needs.

Like other buzzwords in marketing there is a need to return to core principles, a Marketing Manager should have the ability to influence factors that assist in transitioning customers through the journey.  We will be continuing this series as we turn our attention to measuring both the customer experience and journey.

DM Forum

The DM Forum – Melbourne Events and GE Capital

By | Advice for Businesses, News | One Comment

The DM Forum is a quarterly event focused on sharing knowledge between professional marketers. This evening’s forum provided an overview of the City of Melbourne’s event management services, with a focus on community experience and engagement. The City of Melbourne works with event organisers to strengthen the participant’s engagement with the Council, providing an opportunity for further interaction and activity. Events form a significant part of the Council’s approach to drawing people into the CBD and surrounds.

The second speaker discussed the new customer focused approach that was initiated through GE Capital’s Marketing Department. This case study provided an example of how marketing can lead to an innovative approach. GE Capital’s strategic marketing approach identified new customer segments, based on changing consumer trends, following the global financial crisis. The result has been a company that better understands its target markets and has been able to position its communication and products around the identified needs.

The DM Forum offered an opportunity for marketers to gain insight from speakers that have direct experience in utilising marketing to deliver tangible outcomes. The sessions are held on a quarterly basis, visit www.dmforum.com.au for further information.

Jean Paul Gaultier NGV

What happens when you promote something too well?

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Promotion is one facet of marketing. This Saturday I saw an excellent example of promotion at the National Gallery of Victoria. It was the last week of the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit and the gallery was open from late in the evening to midnight.

As an after dinner event with music and a party-like atmosphere it had the potential to be a great date night, mother-daugher bonding activity or family outing.

The gallery provided the option of purchasing the tickets prior to the event, which I did to avoid queues at the door.

I arrived at the National Gallery at 8pm and so did several hundred other people. Unfortunately, most of these people had also pre-purchased their tickets and I was left waiting in a line outside the gallery, then a smaller line to collect a wrist band, followed by a large line to be given access to the exhibit and then finally another smaller line waiting to make my way into the exhibition. Four lines, and more than an hour later, I finally made it to an exhibition that took two hours to see.

Line outside the National Gallery of Victoria

Line outside the National Gallery of Victoria

Had I gone to the National Gallery of Victoria at 10:30pm I would not have had that problem, but like many others I had made the decision to go there after dinner. This experience is an example of what happens when promotion goes too well.

There was a great deal of thought put into the creative collateral developed for this exhibition as well as Public Relations and digital content, however, what the National Gallery of Victoria has not done is manage the follow through effectively.

An excellent use of creative collateral

An excellent use of creative collateral

 

Inside the exhibition

Inside the exhibition

Marketing is more than promotion, it extends to the entire customer experience. From initial contact, to purchase and then interaction, the right marketing should provide a consistent experience.

My experience with the exhibition itself and the purchasing of tickets was a positive one. However having to wait in line with several hundred people was not pleasant.

So what would we recommend to provide your customers with the best possible experience?

It starts by looking at what experience you want to create, and then following this through the entire marketing process.

Marketing strategy can enable you to streamline the mix of marketing tools that create a consistent experience.

For this particular example, while the National Gallery of Victoria created a sufficient amount of excitement around the exhibition; what they did not do was create a positive overall experience. The result diminished the value I had for this particular exhibition.

This could have been avoided by doing the following: 

  • Gathering demographics about participants to gain an understanding of potential purchasing habits and behavioural patterns;
  • Streamlining viewings by staggering attendance times;
  • Notifying individuals of peak periods and estimated wait times;
  • Creating events around peak periods such as themed dinners or pre dinner exhibitions;
  • Working with other venues around the gallery to provide pre and post entertainment.

Promotion is one aspect of marketing. Creating an experience requires looking beyond this. The next time you want to promote something, avoid the trap the National Gallery of Victoria fell into with the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibition and consider promotions to be one part of your marketing mix.

Inside a Marketing Plan – Begin by capturing the Information you need

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Last month we explored our framework, which provides a holistic approach to developing marketing and business strategies.

Over the next few weeks we’re going to delve into a marketing plan, exploring the methodology we utilise to develop and execute a marketing plan.

Capture Business Plan NFP 1000px

Know what you need to Research

The first step is to understand the information you need for a marketing plan. Consider details of your customers, the composition of your products and services, as well as the competitors and industry trends.

Each of these elements should be researched in sufficient depth so that you do not need to make unfounded assumptions.

Identify competitors

Pay particular attention to your competitors, consider not just those that offer similar products or services, but indirect competition as well. What other alternatives exist to purchasing your products or services? These alternatives are all a form of competition and should be considered. For example, a restaurant would not only consider other similar competitors, but also take-away and delivery options.

Furthermore, given that restaurant spending is often used as a form of enjoyment, there is a need to consider alternatives as a form of indirect competition, including movies, theatres and other forms of entertainment.

Know Your Customers

Understand your customers, including what motivates them to make a purchase, as well as key demographic information. Knowing your existing customers will assist in extending your reach within your target markets. If you are a new business or want to consider new markets, then you should assess the customer segments that are being served by competitors and whether you will serve similar demographics or identify alternative targets.

Understand your entire business

Marketing involves your entire business operations. Understand your sales process, how do staff greet customers, do they encourage interaction and the confidence for someone to make a purchase? How could staff encourage purchases or strengthen engagement with customers?

Similarly consider the process for delivering services or products. How could these be improved to strengthen the customer’s experience? It is important these aspects are considered, so that bottlenecks do not emerge if sales are increased.

Research Underpins Your Entire Plan

The Capture Phase sets the foundations for your entire marketing plan. The latter phases of a marketing plan are based on the information that is uncovered during the capture phase. The Capture Phase relies on current and historical information to inform the future direction of your marketing plan.