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Government Archives - Syneka Marketing

ProBono Australia Executive Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Marketing is one of the most misunderstood terms in the not-for-profit sector, resulting in a tactics based approach that fails to deliver tangible value. This afternoon I was invited to present a session on the role of marketing within the not-for-profit sector as part of ProBono Australia’s Executive Webinar series.

This session explored the need for marketing governance within not-for-profit organisations. These foundations are essential in not-for-profit organisations, where the marketing function tends to be dispersed across an organisation.

As a presenter I encourage interactivity so we harnessed the chat functionality of the webinar system to encourage discussion, providing an opportunity to ask questions and work through the content in further detail.

Marketing exists to deliver value, which is essential for not-for-profit organisations which are increasingly required to become market responsive and less dependent on government funding.

Content from this webinar is available on request, please email webinars@synekamarketing.com.au.

A Strategic Approach to Measuring Marketing Performance

By | Advice for Businesses, Resources | No Comments

What value does marketing deliver? This is the number one question any Chief Executive or Chief Financial Officer asks of marketing. Unfortunately, more often than not, the answer is not forthcoming.

This is why marketing is often the first department to be downsized during economic uncertainty, despite logic stating it should be one the of the last. Why is this? Ultimately, it is because marketing has failed to justify its own value.

This situation will not change while marketing follows an execution based approach, lurching between tactics; whether they be social media, content, events; or concepts, like the customer journey or customer experience, which have become so over utilised, they have been severed from any basis in marketing.

This situation is rife across all sizes of organisation; whether for-profit, not-for-profit or government, and yet the traditional approach is rinse and repeat, further eroding the credibility of marketing and its capacity to deliver value.

Since our formation in 2009 we have demonstrated the value that is created through a strategic approach, leading to recognition in the Australian Marketing Institute’s Awards for Marketing Excellence and our designation as Certified Practising Marketers.

Unfortunately, the word strategy has been hijacked by execution led agencies, who have tarnished the term for their own needs. This is despite the fact that the only strategy you will receive for example from a social media agency is social media. This does not provide a marketing strategy that integrates each element of marketing communications and the remaining marketing mix.

In 2016 we want to be able to stop saying we told you so, by preventing the litany of costly marketing mistakes that never should have occurred in the first place.

This is why we developed the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology , which delivers an accountable and measurable marketing approach that is aligned with business goals. The Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology delivers continuous improvement within the marketing function and brings it back to its core definition of delivering value; the same way other business areas have been expected to strengthen outcomes and returns.

The Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology

The Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology commences with a Marketing Audit, which reviews existing activities through stakeholder consultation and internal analysis. The Marketing Audit defines the metrics required to measure marketing outcomes and establishes the foundations to deliver marketing performance.

The Marketing Forecast considers the external environment, identifying competitive pressures, customer demographics and market potential to achieve campaign or marketing goals. The result are outcomes that are optimised to deliver returns, supported through implementation schedules that identify metrics, outcomes and areas of responsibility.

The Marketing Audit and Marketing Forecast are designed to deliver results within the existing resource requirements. The Marketing Plan, the third component of the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology , is designed to align business goals with marketing outcomes. The Marketing Plan considers both the short-term opportunities and the positioning that is required to achieve results into the future. The Marketing Plan defines the metrics that are required to measure marketing outcomes over the life of a business plan.

Marketing Execution is the last element of the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology . This is because tactics and execution need to be guided through a strategic approach and not the other way around.

In the financial world the auditor never undertakes the day-to-day bookkeeping function due to the obvious conflict of interest. Marketing needs a separation between strategy and execution to ensure the delivery of accurate and measurable outcomes.

Our delivery of the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology is undertaken through consulting services and training to build the capacity of marketing teams. Download our free guide of Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology to discover how we are re-defining marketing.

Launch of the 2015 Small Business Festival

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

The Victorian Small Business Festival is a major fixture in the State Government’s business event series.  The Festival, which is held throughout August, features a range of workshops and sessions aimed at fostering business growth.

This afternoon I was invited to the launch, through my role in the Australian Marketing Institute, providing an opportunity meet the participants in the festival, and to gain a broader insight into the program.

Business failure remains an ongoing concern within Australia and Business Victoria has a role in building the capacity of business to stimulate growth and development. Details on the Small Business Festival are available at www.business.vic.gov.au

Significant Women’s Network – Evening with Kelly O’Dwyer

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

The National Foundation for Australian Women and the Significant Women’s Network share a similar ethos in strengthening leadership development for women. This evening the organisations held a dinner and discussion evening with Kelly O’Dywer, the Member for Higgins and Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer.

Kelly discussed the need to promote gender equity through addressing inequities in taxation and the Government’s role in tackling the ongoing issue of domestic violence.  The discussion provided an opportunity to explore how gender inequity can be addressed through the Commonwealth Government and society.

The Significant Women’s Network hosts a series of professional development and networking events throughout the year, for further details visit www.significantwomensnetwork.com

Membership Growth

Strengthen your membership programs for 2015 and beyond

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

The most significant challenge facing the not-for-profit sector is the need to diversify income beyond a reliance on government grants. Membership is often is an area that can be developed to increase engagement and provide a sustainable revenue stream.

Syneka Marketing in partnership with Membership Growth has developed the Membership Growth Toolkit. The Complete Toolkit includes nine chapters, covering all aspects of developing membership programs, recruiting members and member retention.

The Membership Growth Toolkit explores the following topics, across nine chapters:

  • Marketing Planning Strategies
  • Member Recruitment Strategies
  • Member Retention Strategies
  • Member Renewal/Reactivation
  • Revenue Earning
  • Recession Busting Strategies for Sustainable Growth
  • Design and Copywriting
  • Online Marketing


Each chapter includes worksheets to help you develop your membership strategies. The Membership Growth Toolkit is available for purchase at www.membershipgrowthtoolkit.com.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne's Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

Five essential tips to foster effective collaboration

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Government funding has been encouraging collaboration for several years, with grants strongly favouring applications that involve multiple partners. Increasingly businesses are also seeing merit in collaboration to recognise respective expertise, and to achieve shared outcomes.

Collaboration should be nurtured and encouraged, but unfortunately there are also plenty of businesses that talk about collaboration, but do not follow through in practice.

As a strategic marketing agency we often work with other specialists to support our clients in achieving their goals. We thought it would be useful to share our advice on how to foster collaboration.

  1. Agree on the outcomes. Before considering any form of collaboration, ensure that there is an agreement on the outcomes that are to be achieved and the impact that this will create.
  2. Ensure you work with partners who share these outcomes. A supplier is not necessarily a collaborative partner, unless they are actively involved in sharing the agreed outcomes.
  3. Recognise expertise and responsibilities. Make sure that all collaborative partners are aware of their roles and the specific expertise that is required. Each partner should recognise each others expertise and not attempt to overreach.
  4. Collaborative partners need to be treated as equals. While money and time commitments may vary, there should be an equitable level of involvement to ensure that everyone is contributing to the outcome.
  5. Review partnerships and revise when required. All partnerships should be periodically reviewed and revised if needed. Identify what is working in the partnership and what need to be improved.

One of my highlights in working collaboratively was during the time I was Mayor of Maroondah in 2010. Ringwood, had been identified a Central Activities District, which meant it was to be strengthened as a residential and commercial hub.

One of the challenges, however, was the need to encourage the State Government to commit to the redevelopment of Ringwood Station, given it failed to meet accessibility standards and was perceived to be unsafe. While Ringwood was clearly in need of funding, the broader issue was the lack of Government involvement in its own transport and planning policies.

One of my highlights in developing a collaborative approach was during the time I was Mayor of Maroondah in 2010. Ringwood, had been identified a Central Activities District, which meant it was to be strengthened as a residential and commercial hub.

One of the challenges, however, was the need to encourage the State Government to commit to the redevelopment of Ringwood Station, given it failed to meet accessibility standards and was perceived to be unsafe. While Ringwood was clearly in need of funding, the broader issue was the lack of Government involvement in its own transport and planning policies.

One outer suburban council on its own, lacks direct influence with a State Government. As a result, I worked with Bill Pemberton, the Mayor of Whitehorse and Christine Richards, the Mayor of Frankston, to form an alliance so we could advocate for greater support for our respective Central Activities Districts (Box Hill, Frankston and Ringwood). We then expanded this alliance into a formal arrangement that incorporated every Central Activity District in Melbourne. While each individual Council had its own priorities, this group succeeded in developing joint advocacy by focusing on common issues.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne's Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne’s Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

The end result was a greater level of investment and interest within each of Melbourne’s Central Activities Districts, including a commitment to redevelop Ringwood Station.

Before considering a collaborative approach make sure there is a common understanding, so you can work together to achieve your agreed outcomes.