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governance Archives - Syneka Marketing

We are redefining marketing – hear us speak at two upcoming events

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Resources | No Comments

Our vision is to redefine marketing and we do this by delivering measurable and accountable marketing outcomes through the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .
Throughout June we will be presenting at several key events to highlight the role of marketing and the need for marketing to step up and deliver outcomes that reinforce organisational goals.

Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

On Wednesday the 8th of June we will be hosting Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance, a feature webinar hosted by ProBono Australia.

Not-for-profit organisations are facing immense pressure to become market responsive and yet marketing remains widely misunderstood in the not-for-profit sector.
This one hour webinar will assist not-for-profit organisations in developing a strategic approach to marketing. We will explore the sequencing and touchpoints required to enhance the stakeholder experience and explore the framework required to instill effective marketing governance and accountabilities.

Attend this session to ensure an alignment between marketing outcomes and organisational goals and generate a positive return from marketing resources.

Register through EventBrite to attend this session for Wednesday the 8th of June at 2pm. Pricing is $55 for individuals and $300 for organisations (with unlimited staff access).

The Business Seesaw at the Melbourne Brekkie Club

On Thursday the 9th of June we will be presenting at the Very Melbourne Brekkie Club, through the Melbourne Business Network in a collaboration with Paul Ostaff, from our management consulting partner, Reignite Consulting.

Join us as we discuss the Business Seesaw, as we explore the infrastructure required for businesses to build their operational and marketing capacity. Many businesses struggle to balance the need for business growth through marketing and service. Reignite Consulting and Syneka Marketing will be outlining our framework for businesses to achieve operational and marketing excellence.

Details and registration is available via EventBrite and is open to members of the Melbourne Business Network.

Marketing Governance: Mitigating reputational and financial risks

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Good governance needs to underpin all aspects of a business or organisation and this holds true for marketing. Unfortunately, marketing governance tends to be substantially underdeveloped, with blurred responsibilities and a lack of sufficient oversight.

The most evident examples are seen in social media, where a lack of oversight and a failure to link execution with strategic direction, has resulted in significant public mistakes by businesses (including large businesses like Woolworths and McDonalds), as well as not-for-profit organisations (as evidenced through the failed YourTaxis campaign).

Marketing Governance defines the roles and responsibilities of the marketing function, by considering three core elements:

2016-02-29 Levels

  1. Level 1: Executive – Leadership and Direction – Marketing leadership and strategic direction needs to be established at an executive level. This is often the Chief Marketing Officer and the Executive Team, or a combination of the board and Executive Officer within not-for-profit organisations. The strategic marketing direction needs to be consistent with the organisation’s vision.  In particular, the entire marketing mix needs to be considered, to ensure that marketing has visibility and suitable influence across the organisation. Suitable structures should be developed to support the need for marketing to be integrated into other business areas.
  1. Level 2: Management – Accountability and Oversight – Management is accountable for delivering the strategies that will achieve the goals established through the marketing plan. Management should determine the appropriate activities and tactics (within budget and resource parameters) that will collectively achieve the identified direction. Management is responsible for oversight across these activities to ensure consistency and to evaluate results. Management should be empowered to not only measure marketing performance, but to adjust these activities if the expected outcomes are not being realised. As a result, management must be able to measure marketing performance and be fully aware of the customer journey and sequencing that is required to motivate action.
  1. Level 3: Implementation – Execution – Execution is where relevant marketing tactics are undertaken based on the decisions made by management. The execution layer can involve internal teams, external partners or a combined approach, but should always have a clear understanding of the outcomes required. It is imperative that execution activities are briefed correctly and that inputs and outputs are not mistaken for marketing outcomes. Management needs oversight over execution to ensure that outcomes are consistent and delivering anticipated results. Measuring marketing performance enables adjustments and to ensure that all execution elements are working as intended.

Marketing Governance is an area that is far too often overlooked, but is required to ensure the evaluation of marketing performance and to reduce reputational and financial risk.

Marketing, as a function, and organisations overall, need to develop capabilities in marketing governance so we can finally see an end to mistakes that never should have occurred in the first place, had oversight and direction been suitably established.

Complimentary Consultations to help the not-for-profit sector re-define marketing

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations | No Comments

We offered complimentary marketing consultations during the conference and it was great to see the overwhelming response, with our sessions being oversubscribed. While each organisation has its own unique challenges, common areas of focus included:

  • The need to segment stakeholders and to understand their outcomes. Many not-for-profit organisations view their end-clients as a target market, but omit the need to reach prospective volunteers, board members, government, funding organisations and others.
  • Consideration of intermediaries and partner organisations. Many not-for-profit organisations have limited budgets, meaning broadcast communications are often beyond their reach. Instead, there is a need to form partnerships and explore intermediary organisations to reach relevant stakeholders.
  • Marketing metrics are not defined, leading to lack of measurability and confusion over inputs, outputs and outcomes. Website visitations, or attendance at information sessions are inputs, donation enquiries are an output and the actual donation is the outcome. Organisations need to understand the decision making journey (customer journey) and the sequence that is required to generate action.
  • Lack of marketing governance. Roles between board, management, staff and external parties are ill-defined, hampering the ability to measure performance and establish strategic direction.

These challenges are shared by both businesses and not-for-profit organisations, demonstrating the ongoing need to re-define marketing so it returns to its core of being led by strategic insights and not by execution.

Thank you to the participants of these sessions and for the fantastic feedback we received. We hope that the attendees at the National Volunteering Conference are able to build their marketing capacity and demonstrate the value they provide.

Marketing Metrics for Not-for-profit organisations

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Marketing is only effective when it is measured and evaluated, as this ensures that outcomes are being achieved. The need for measurability is particularly important for not-for-profit organisations due to the mix of stakeholders involved.

This morning I facilitated an interactive workshop with not-for-profit organisations, in partnership with Xponential and Morgan Stanley.
The session explored the role of marketing and the need for alignment with organisational goals. We explored the need to engage and understand key stakeholders, as well as the need for consistency across the marketing mix.

We also focused on marketing governance, through the board maintaining its role in setting direction and evaluating outcomes. Management should deliver against these requirements to ensure that desired outcomes are being achieved, while being supported by teams that deliver relevant tactics.

Building marketing capacity is critical for the not-for-profit sector as it needs to diversify revenue sources and strengthen the demonstrable impact.

Aldi - not thinking about the context of their social media content

Another week and another example of poor marketing governance

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Aldi provides us with the latest example of a social media failure, with its fill in the blank exercise posted onto Twitter.

Aldi - not thinking about the context of their social media content

Aldi – not thinking about the context of their social media content

While the resulting media coverage joked that ‘Aldi’s social media intern is about to get fired’, the joke should be the way social media is not seen as a communications tool and therefore part of the marketing mix.

Over the course of 2015 there was no shortage social media failures. In April we saw Woolworths‘ poorly planned attempt to associate itself with Anzac Day, followed by the Victorian Taxi Association not only misspelling Remembrance Day, but also failing to consider the ramifications of asking Twitter users their thoughts on the taxi industry.

These are all examples of where marketing governance has failed. The ability to publish externally viewable content has become disconnected from campaign planning and strategy, causing mistakes that can result in reputational damage.

Yet, these mistakes are not new. Had Woolworths, Aldi, the Victorian Taxi Association and many others, actually undertaken research, they would have seen the 2012 example of #McDStories, whereby McDonald’s asked Twitter users for their stories about the McDonald’s experience. The campaign lasted for just two hours until it was realised that asking about the McDonald’s experience via social media was not a good conversation topic.

Commentary through the McDStories campaign - back in 2012

Commentary through the McDStories campaign – back in 2012

 

Social media needs to be seen for what it is, a communications tool that is part of the marketing mix. Unfortunately, this is likely to re-occur until sound marketing governance is developed. Marketing needs the processes, procedures and policies to determine the optimal scope of authority in the marketing mix to prevent mistakes that never should have occurred in the first instance.

Australian Marketing Institute – Victorian End of Year Function

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Presentations | No Comments

Over the past twelve months, the Australian Marketing Institute (AMI) has focused on strengthening its capacity, including a new governance structure, newly appointed CEO and a re-forming of its State Committees. The aim for 2014 was to strengthen these foundations so the AMI can expand its presence in 2015 and beyond.

Tonight we held AMI Victoria’s final activity for 2014, an end of year networking event. While formalities were kept to a minimum, the event provided an opportunity to introduce the members of the new Victorian Advisory Committee. This event was also my first in my role as Chair of the Victorian Advisory Committee. It was fantastic to speak to the attendees, and to gain an insight into their experiences and skills.

Planning is underway for 2015, with a renewed focus on demonstrating the value of marketing and elevating the role of the Australian Marketing Institute. Our first event for 2015 will be a breakfast on the 26th of February discussing Big Data. Stay tuned for details and other exciting events in the new year.