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funding Archives - Syneka Marketing

ProBono Australia Executive Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Marketing is one of the most misunderstood terms in the not-for-profit sector, resulting in a tactics based approach that fails to deliver tangible value. This afternoon I was invited to present a session on the role of marketing within the not-for-profit sector as part of ProBono Australia’s Executive Webinar series.

This session explored the need for marketing governance within not-for-profit organisations. These foundations are essential in not-for-profit organisations, where the marketing function tends to be dispersed across an organisation.

As a presenter I encourage interactivity so we harnessed the chat functionality of the webinar system to encourage discussion, providing an opportunity to ask questions and work through the content in further detail.

Marketing exists to deliver value, which is essential for not-for-profit organisations which are increasingly required to become market responsive and less dependent on government funding.

Content from this webinar is available on request, please email webinars@synekamarketing.com.au.

Complimentary Consultations to help the not-for-profit sector re-define marketing

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations | No Comments

We offered complimentary marketing consultations during the conference and it was great to see the overwhelming response, with our sessions being oversubscribed. While each organisation has its own unique challenges, common areas of focus included:

  • The need to segment stakeholders and to understand their outcomes. Many not-for-profit organisations view their end-clients as a target market, but omit the need to reach prospective volunteers, board members, government, funding organisations and others.
  • Consideration of intermediaries and partner organisations. Many not-for-profit organisations have limited budgets, meaning broadcast communications are often beyond their reach. Instead, there is a need to form partnerships and explore intermediary organisations to reach relevant stakeholders.
  • Marketing metrics are not defined, leading to lack of measurability and confusion over inputs, outputs and outcomes. Website visitations, or attendance at information sessions are inputs, donation enquiries are an output and the actual donation is the outcome. Organisations need to understand the decision making journey (customer journey) and the sequence that is required to generate action.
  • Lack of marketing governance. Roles between board, management, staff and external parties are ill-defined, hampering the ability to measure performance and establish strategic direction.

These challenges are shared by both businesses and not-for-profit organisations, demonstrating the ongoing need to re-define marketing so it returns to its core of being led by strategic insights and not by execution.

Thank you to the participants of these sessions and for the fantastic feedback we received. We hope that the attendees at the National Volunteering Conference are able to build their marketing capacity and demonstrate the value they provide.

Melbourne Women’s Fund Anniversary Celebration

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Melbourne Women’s Fund provides the opportunity for women to undertake collective giving, where funding is donated to organisations that support women and families.

This evening I attended the anniversary of the Melbourne Women’s Fund, celebrating its first year of operations. The Fund enables individuals who share a common passion for particular causes to have a greater collective impact through donations and support.

The Anniversary Celebrations provided the opportunity to reflect on this impact and to meet key supporters.  Philanthropy remains a significant contributor to the funding of charities and it is great to see the success of the Melbourne Women’s’ Fund.

Early Childhood Management Services Annual General Meeting

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News | No Comments

Early Childhood Management Services (ECMS) is a not-for-profit organisation and Victoria’s largest provider of early education and care for children. ECMS is one of our valued clients and we have worked closely with them in developing their marketing presence.

Tonight we attended the ECMS Annual General Meeting, providing a reflection on their achievements over 2014 and a focus on their future direction. Every not-for-profit organisation needs to hold an AGM and to produce an Annual Report. Rather than being considered as a regulatory requirement, these activities should be seen as key marketing tools.

This year ECMS produced an online Annual Report, providing insights into the reach of their services, as well as the impact they create through their work in early education and care. The Annual Report was supported through their Annual General Meeting, which involved key partners to further reinforce the strategic direction of the organisation.

Collaborative partners, funding bodies and other stakeholders will often request copies of an Annual Report. Utilising the report as an opportunity to convey your narrative and impact provides the ability to better engage with these stakeholders.

The work undertaken by ECMS in creating their online Annual Report platform demonstrates how a not-for-profit organisation can reinforce their impact in the community.

The ECMS Annual Report for 2014 is available from www.ecms.org.au/annualreport2014

5000 Poppies to 100,000 – Crowdfunding Australia’s largest community arts tribute

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

In 2013 a grassroots campaign was started to hand make 5000 poppies. By 2015 over 100,000 poppies have been created across Australia.

We’re supporting 5000 poppies, and asking the community to help crowdfund Australia’s largest community based tribute of respect and remembrance.

5000 poppies was created by local artists Lynn Berry and Margaret Knight, whose fathers had fought in WWII. Community interest, from individuals and groups such as the Country Women’s Association, RSLs, schools and libraries, has seen thousands of contributors donate their time.

The intent is to unveil the poppies at Federation Square this ANZAC Day to ensure that the tributes can be properly acknowledged. Funding is required for event management and regulatory compliance and a budget of $50,000 is required to meet these needs.

5000 Poppies is Australia’s largest community arts project and we are pleased to be able to support this tribute. To assist in the fundraising campaign we produced a video outlining the aims of the project and how people can get involved.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne's Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

Five essential tips to foster effective collaboration

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Government funding has been encouraging collaboration for several years, with grants strongly favouring applications that involve multiple partners. Increasingly businesses are also seeing merit in collaboration to recognise respective expertise, and to achieve shared outcomes.

Collaboration should be nurtured and encouraged, but unfortunately there are also plenty of businesses that talk about collaboration, but do not follow through in practice.

As a strategic marketing agency we often work with other specialists to support our clients in achieving their goals. We thought it would be useful to share our advice on how to foster collaboration.

  1. Agree on the outcomes. Before considering any form of collaboration, ensure that there is an agreement on the outcomes that are to be achieved and the impact that this will create.
  2. Ensure you work with partners who share these outcomes. A supplier is not necessarily a collaborative partner, unless they are actively involved in sharing the agreed outcomes.
  3. Recognise expertise and responsibilities. Make sure that all collaborative partners are aware of their roles and the specific expertise that is required. Each partner should recognise each others expertise and not attempt to overreach.
  4. Collaborative partners need to be treated as equals. While money and time commitments may vary, there should be an equitable level of involvement to ensure that everyone is contributing to the outcome.
  5. Review partnerships and revise when required. All partnerships should be periodically reviewed and revised if needed. Identify what is working in the partnership and what need to be improved.

One of my highlights in working collaboratively was during the time I was Mayor of Maroondah in 2010. Ringwood, had been identified a Central Activities District, which meant it was to be strengthened as a residential and commercial hub.

One of the challenges, however, was the need to encourage the State Government to commit to the redevelopment of Ringwood Station, given it failed to meet accessibility standards and was perceived to be unsafe. While Ringwood was clearly in need of funding, the broader issue was the lack of Government involvement in its own transport and planning policies.

One of my highlights in developing a collaborative approach was during the time I was Mayor of Maroondah in 2010. Ringwood, had been identified a Central Activities District, which meant it was to be strengthened as a residential and commercial hub.

One of the challenges, however, was the need to encourage the State Government to commit to the redevelopment of Ringwood Station, given it failed to meet accessibility standards and was perceived to be unsafe. While Ringwood was clearly in need of funding, the broader issue was the lack of Government involvement in its own transport and planning policies.

One outer suburban council on its own, lacks direct influence with a State Government. As a result, I worked with Bill Pemberton, the Mayor of Whitehorse and Christine Richards, the Mayor of Frankston, to form an alliance so we could advocate for greater support for our respective Central Activities Districts (Box Hill, Frankston and Ringwood). We then expanded this alliance into a formal arrangement that incorporated every Central Activity District in Melbourne. While each individual Council had its own priorities, this group succeeded in developing joint advocacy by focusing on common issues.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne's Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

Alex and each of the Mayors of Melbourne’s Central Activities Districts, signing a collaborative agreement.

The end result was a greater level of investment and interest within each of Melbourne’s Central Activities Districts, including a commitment to redevelop Ringwood Station.

Before considering a collaborative approach make sure there is a common understanding, so you can work together to achieve your agreed outcomes.