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experience Archives - Syneka Marketing

Megan Nolan – Top 100 Future Leaders

By | News | No Comments

On the 8th of February, I had the honour of being recognised as one of the Top 100 Future leaders of 2018. GradConnection and Fusion Graduate Consultancy partner each year to assess, test and interview thousands of university students from around Australia to find the next best 100 leaders. 10 Students from 10 different industries were selected, I was proudly elected for marketing.

After completing a lengthy application form detailing my grades, experience and passions in September 2017, I underwent a series of tests designed to identify my strengths, weaknesses and compatibility with leadership positions. This included a video interview and a selection of psychometric tests which were conducted over the final 3 months of 2017.

Last Thursday, myself and 99 other selected Top 100 Future Leaders were flown to Sydney to participate in an assessment process run by GradConnection at the University of Technology Sydney. It was a demanding day intended to test time management, teamwork and public speaking and among other skills required for leaders.

The experience filled me with pride, it is a tremendous feeling to be recognised in your field. But more than that, it was exhilarating to be surrounded by students of all ages that were as passionate and dedicated to their work as I am.

Although I have been always been diligent and studious, I know I owe much of my good fortune to the education I have received from RMIT University and the opportunity to develop my knowledge and skills to Syneka Marketing.

Simon Sinek promotes that “it’s not how or what you do, it’s why you do it that is important.” I study hard at university because I love learning and I work hard at Syneka because I am passionate for marketing. I believe I was recognised by GradConnection and Fusion Graduate Consultancy because I am both dedicated to constantly bettering myself and the world around me.

 

We are redefining marketing – hear us speak at two upcoming events

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Resources | No Comments

Our vision is to redefine marketing and we do this by delivering measurable and accountable marketing outcomes through the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .
Throughout June we will be presenting at several key events to highlight the role of marketing and the need for marketing to step up and deliver outcomes that reinforce organisational goals.

Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

On Wednesday the 8th of June we will be hosting Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance, a feature webinar hosted by ProBono Australia.

Not-for-profit organisations are facing immense pressure to become market responsive and yet marketing remains widely misunderstood in the not-for-profit sector.
This one hour webinar will assist not-for-profit organisations in developing a strategic approach to marketing. We will explore the sequencing and touchpoints required to enhance the stakeholder experience and explore the framework required to instill effective marketing governance and accountabilities.

Attend this session to ensure an alignment between marketing outcomes and organisational goals and generate a positive return from marketing resources.

Register through EventBrite to attend this session for Wednesday the 8th of June at 2pm. Pricing is $55 for individuals and $300 for organisations (with unlimited staff access).

The Business Seesaw at the Melbourne Brekkie Club

On Thursday the 9th of June we will be presenting at the Very Melbourne Brekkie Club, through the Melbourne Business Network in a collaboration with Paul Ostaff, from our management consulting partner, Reignite Consulting.

Join us as we discuss the Business Seesaw, as we explore the infrastructure required for businesses to build their operational and marketing capacity. Many businesses struggle to balance the need for business growth through marketing and service. Reignite Consulting and Syneka Marketing will be outlining our framework for businesses to achieve operational and marketing excellence.

Details and registration is available via EventBrite and is open to members of the Melbourne Business Network.

Do not overlook your products and services

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

The marketing mix, or customer experience, forms the foundation of a strategic marketing approach. Each element within the mix needs to be considered from a strategic perspective to ensure alignment between business goals, market value and marketing outcomes.

While many businesses understand the core of what they offer, they often overlook the other attributes that consist of their product or service. A product or service will typically have three core components:

  1. The Core  – the fundamental need you provide. The core is the generic need that that is fulfilled by utilising your product or service. For example in hospitality you are satisfying hunger, or shelter for accommodation. This is often cited as one of the reasons for the failure of Kodak, since it failed to consider that its products provide story telling or memories, not photography.
  2. Actual product – the tangible components that customers interact with. This is the physical configuration of the product or service, including packaging, staff interaction and the product itself. Hospitality incorporates the setting of the restaurant, cuisine selection and attitudes of staff. In the case of Kodak, the product included the film quality, packaging and store interaction. Had Kodak considered its product as storytelling or memories, then the actual product would have encompassed digital storage, cameras and photography sharing.
  3. Augmented product – additional components you can offer to differentiate yourself from competitors, which reinforce your value proposition. A fine dining restaurant may incorporate an additional course in a degustation menu for regular customers, while a hotel may offer valet parking or extended check outs.
Product components

A product consists of many components – all of them need to be part of the marketing mix

Failing to incorporate a holistic view of your products or services will cause fragmentation within the marketing mix and diminish outcomes. Marketing needs visibility and influence into product development and service composition to ensure alignment across each element of the marketing mix.

Complimentary Consultations to help the not-for-profit sector re-define marketing

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations | No Comments

We offered complimentary marketing consultations during the conference and it was great to see the overwhelming response, with our sessions being oversubscribed. While each organisation has its own unique challenges, common areas of focus included:

  • The need to segment stakeholders and to understand their outcomes. Many not-for-profit organisations view their end-clients as a target market, but omit the need to reach prospective volunteers, board members, government, funding organisations and others.
  • Consideration of intermediaries and partner organisations. Many not-for-profit organisations have limited budgets, meaning broadcast communications are often beyond their reach. Instead, there is a need to form partnerships and explore intermediary organisations to reach relevant stakeholders.
  • Marketing metrics are not defined, leading to lack of measurability and confusion over inputs, outputs and outcomes. Website visitations, or attendance at information sessions are inputs, donation enquiries are an output and the actual donation is the outcome. Organisations need to understand the decision making journey (customer journey) and the sequence that is required to generate action.
  • Lack of marketing governance. Roles between board, management, staff and external parties are ill-defined, hampering the ability to measure performance and establish strategic direction.

These challenges are shared by both businesses and not-for-profit organisations, demonstrating the ongoing need to re-define marketing so it returns to its core of being led by strategic insights and not by execution.

Thank you to the participants of these sessions and for the fantastic feedback we received. We hope that the attendees at the National Volunteering Conference are able to build their marketing capacity and demonstrate the value they provide.

The Launch of the 2016 Australian Marketing Institute Event Series

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

The Australian Marketing Institute is the professional organisation representing the marketing profession. Tonight we officially launched our event series for 2016, highlighting key events that will strengthen the marketing profession.

Our professional development series, consisting of webinars, is being complemented with breakfast educational events, providing the ability to explore topics in further detail. Emerging Marketers, connecting new marketers with experienced professionals will be returning from May, providing the ability to share skills and knowledge within the profession.

Alex launching the 2016 event series for the Australian Marketing Institute

Alex launching the 2016 event series for the Australian Marketing Institute

Tonight’s launch coincided with a networking evening, showcasing partners of the Australian Marketing Institute, as well as the ability to engage new and current members. The aim is to continue a series of events throughout this year to foster connections between members, as we work towards strengthening the marketing profession.

The 2016 Awards for Marketing Excellence will be opening on the 7th of March with an expanded set of categories to further showcase the marketing profession.

Aldi - not thinking about the context of their social media content

Another week and another example of poor marketing governance

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Aldi provides us with the latest example of a social media failure, with its fill in the blank exercise posted onto Twitter.

Aldi - not thinking about the context of their social media content

Aldi – not thinking about the context of their social media content

While the resulting media coverage joked that ‘Aldi’s social media intern is about to get fired’, the joke should be the way social media is not seen as a communications tool and therefore part of the marketing mix.

Over the course of 2015 there was no shortage social media failures. In April we saw Woolworths‘ poorly planned attempt to associate itself with Anzac Day, followed by the Victorian Taxi Association not only misspelling Remembrance Day, but also failing to consider the ramifications of asking Twitter users their thoughts on the taxi industry.

These are all examples of where marketing governance has failed. The ability to publish externally viewable content has become disconnected from campaign planning and strategy, causing mistakes that can result in reputational damage.

Yet, these mistakes are not new. Had Woolworths, Aldi, the Victorian Taxi Association and many others, actually undertaken research, they would have seen the 2012 example of #McDStories, whereby McDonald’s asked Twitter users for their stories about the McDonald’s experience. The campaign lasted for just two hours until it was realised that asking about the McDonald’s experience via social media was not a good conversation topic.

Commentary through the McDStories campaign - back in 2012

Commentary through the McDStories campaign – back in 2012

 

Social media needs to be seen for what it is, a communications tool that is part of the marketing mix. Unfortunately, this is likely to re-occur until sound marketing governance is developed. Marketing needs the processes, procedures and policies to determine the optimal scope of authority in the marketing mix to prevent mistakes that never should have occurred in the first instance.