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core services Archives - Syneka Marketing

Port Phillip Business Network – Networking Drinks

By | Advice for Businesses, News | No Comments

The Port Phillip Business Network connects businesses within the City of Port Phillip, providing a combination of networking and professional development. This evening we attended a networking session designed to connect businesses across the municipality.

While there are many business groups available, the Port Phillip Business Network has a particular focus on collaboration. As a result, there is an emphasis on exploring how complementary businesses can work together to achieve a greater impact. We’re looking forward to becoming further involved with the Port Phillip Business Network and developing collaboration between our core services of strategic marketing and complementary providers.

The Port Phillip Business Networks meets on a regular basis, details are available at www.ppbn.com.au.

Creating new opportunities through Social Enterprises

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | One Comment

The formation of social enterprises is becoming increasingly important for not-for-profit organisations and charities, as they seek to diversify income and reduce dependence on government funding.

A social enterprise exists to generate not only a positive financial return, but also to achieve broader community outcomes.

There is no formalised definition, but in 2009 Social Traders partnered with the Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies (ACPNS) at the Queensland University of Technology and identified the following attributes:

  • Are led by an economic, social, cultural, or environmental mission consistent with a public or community benefit;
  • Trade to fulfil their mission;
  • Derive a substantial portion of their income from trade; and
  • Reinvest the majority of their profit/surplus in the fulfilment of their mission.

We have worked with several organisations in developing strategies and implementing concepts for social enterprises. As a result, we’ve seen several elements that we believe are crucial for success.

Provide a commercial focus, while retaining core values

A social enterprise, like any other business venture, needs to generate a positive return. A social enterprise that is continually dependent on grants or donations, is not diversifying the income of an organisation, or expanding its capacity.

As a result, there is a need for organisations to have a commercial mindset that can also recognise positive social outcomes.

We recently worked with six inner city community learning centres to develop a new social enterprise through the Inner North Cluster. The social enterprise will aggregate resources and reduce duplication, with the aim of providing services to other centres. There is a need for a business perspective to achieve the social outcomes that would enable the individual centres to focus on their core services of providing educational opportunities.

Connect the social enterprise with the core purpose of your organisations

The products or services of a social enterprise should have a correlation with the key strengths and purpose of an organisation. Maintaining this correlation will help during the formation of the social enterprise and facilitate the exchange of knowledge.

We’ve worked with Volunteering Western Victoria to develop Governance Mentors, a program that will provide mentors to community organisations and improve the governance of committees.

Governance Mentors correlates to Volunteering Western Victoria’s aim of expanding the capacity of community organisations through training and skills development. The social enterprise broadens the organisation’s reach, but still relates to its core values.

Social enterprises will often require substantial discussion and planning

Social enterprises will often require substantial discussion and planning

A social enterprise like any good idea needs a plan

Establishing a social enterprise will require initial financial resources and time. Developing a plan enables an organisation to identify how the social enterprise can achieve its aims, while delivering a positive financial return.

Social enterprises need to add value and not compound existing problems. Planning ensures that opportunities are identified and that risks are considered.

Social enterprises can be time consuming in their initial formation, but they can lead to not only additional income, but also an expanded capacity to deliver the core values of an organisation. We have enjoyed working with a range of organisation to develop their social enterprises.

Ensure that there is sufficient time to consider media releases and promotion for your event.

Training Workshop: Marketing for Media and Events

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Many not-for-profit organisations conduct events to raise awareness or as fundraisers to provide support to their core services. We conducted a half-day workshop on events and media in conjunction with Eastern Volunteers.

There are considerable challenges in managing events, particularly in ensuring that the activities support the aims of the organisation and provide a positive return. Many not-for-profit organisations do not have the resources available for a dedicated events team. Subcommittees can be useful in overcoming these constraints by encouraging staff and volunteer participation, while also enabling a range of people and skills to become involved in planning and conducting an event.

Events should be evaluated against objectives to justify the commitment and resources. For example, it may be useful to evaluate the effectiveness of an event in regard to fundraising, staff resources, financial return and awareness.

Ensure that there is sufficient time to consider media releases and promotion for your event.

Ensure that there is sufficient time to consider media releases and promotion for your event.

Business Sponsorship is often required to support community events and it is critical that an organisation is able to demonstrate tangible benefits for this support. Not-for-profit organisations should prepare information packages that outline the benefits of sponsorship, including the audience reach and ongoing coverage. It is often useful to determine whether an event attracts a particular demographic and to target businesses who wish to reach a similar target market.

Several levels of sponsorship should be provided, with clear differences in value between each package. Providing a range of sponsorship packages, enables several businesses to become involved and encourages the potential to upgrade support in future years.

Businesses should be encouraged to be present during the event and to see first-hand the results of their investment. Providing photographs and videos also enables businesses with ongoing materials from the event and can support discussions for support in future years.

Events also need to be sufficiently promoted and it is often useful to plan backwards when organising an event. This approach will help ensure that invitations, media releases and other promotional tools are dispatched in time.

Media releases should be relevant to the audience of the media outlet to assist in coverage. Often it useful to speak to a journalist directly to reiterate key points from the media release. Journalists will not be able to cover every aspect of an event so ensure that the essential information is conveyed in the media release and during conversation.

The Workshop received extremely positive feedback and will hopefully assist organisations in planning and conducting their events.