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conference Archives - Page 2 of 6 - Syneka Marketing

Our YouTube Premiere – We Discuss ‘What Is Marketing?’

By Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Resources No Comments

At Syneka Marketing we know social media. To showcase how social media can help your business or organisation, we have started a YouTube channel.

We believe that YouTube has significant possibilities in enabling businesses to directly connect with communities and potential clients.

Globally, YouTube is the third most viewed website in the world, after Google and Facebook. Over four billion videos are viewed every day using this platform.

As a marketing agency we thought that we should start with the basics and explore the fundamentals through, What is Marketing?

Marketing is a concept that is often misinterpreted. The basis of good marketing begins with a strategy that enables you to achieve your goals. Marketing is more than sales, direct marketing, graphic design and website development; it is about providing a holistic approach that addresses your needs.

We wanted to produce a video that was of high quality and informative. We want to educate our audiences on marketing and the tools that are available. We thought that the best way to implement this vision, was to work with a professional film crew  to achieve our vision.

Being in front of the camera was quite an interesting experience. Alex and I are used to speaking in front of audiences, but talking directly to a camera is quite a different experience. For example, speaking to a camera doesn’t provide the same interaction that you gain when you are in front of an audience during a conference or workshop.

We hope that our YouTube presence will complement our work as an agency and raise the level of discussion in regard to marketing.

The 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

By Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations, Resources No Comments

The National Conference on Volunteering is a peak annual event for volunteer involving organisations across Australia. The event was organised by Volunteering Australia and hosted by Volunteering SA&NT.

Our Managing Director Alex prepares for his presentation at the 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

Our Managing Director Alex prepares for his presentation at the 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

The Conference had four key themes:

  • Lead – to encourage inspirational leadership
  • Partner – collaboration to achieve results
  • Build – creating innovation
  • Sustain – strengthening foundations

During the conference I co-presented a presentation with Julie Pettett, the CEO Of Volunteering Western Victoria. Putting Research into Practice – the Marketing and Rebranding of Wimmera Volunteers. The presentation discussed the importance of marketing and the experiences of Volunteering Western Victoria in re-engaging with its communities.

Volunteering Western Victoria, was formerly known as Wimmera Volunteers and had remained a static organisation, despite the changing nature of volunteering. There was a need to re-engage the community and to broaden its presence outside of Horsham in Western Victoria.

Alex co-presented with Julie Pettett the CEO of Volunteering Western Victoria

Alex co-presented with Julie Pettett the CEO of Volunteering Western Victoria

Syneka Marketing assisted Volunteering Western Victoria by developing a marketing plan that identified a future direction for the organisation. The marketing plan identified four goals supported in the businesses plan:

  • Be an effective peak organisation
  • Grow access to resources
  • Build capacity in the volunteer and community sector
  • Organisation development

These goals were supported by two further priorities identified in the marketing plan:

  • Diversify and Sustain Funding Support
  • Rebrand Wimmera Volunteers

A business plan identifies what an organisation wants to achieve and a marketing plan looks how to achieve this vision.  A marketing plan then considers the key messages and marketing tools that can reach the required stakeholders.

Diversifying income became a priority, due to the need to decrease dependence on government revenue.  The marketing plan identified business partnerships, the introduction of membership, fundraising and philanthropic programs that could add new income sources. These strategies supported the business plan, with membership complementing the desire to be a peak organisation and partnerships, enabling the development of new programs.

The rebranding of Wimmera Volunteers arose due to the need to position the organisation as a peak body and to re-engage with its community.  A new name, visual identity, logo and marketing materials were developed in six weeks, to launch the new brand at the 2012 Annual General Meeting.

Volunteering Western Victoria

Volunteering Western Victoria

The name Volunteering Western Victoria was selected, since it clearly defined the purpose of the organisation and the role it has in supporting volunteering across Western Victoria.  The tagline  Empowering Communities, Supporting Volunteers, reinforced the impact that the organisation has a local and individual level.

Not-for-profit organisations have limited marketing budgets and a result names should be clearly identifiable to avoid the need to explain the purpose of the organisation.

The new visual identity and brand for Volunteering Western Victoria

The new visual identity and brand for Volunteering Western Victoria

Marketing within not-for-profit organisations requires the ability to reach numerous stakeholders. There is a need for marketing messages that provide a consistent narrative, while being tailored to the needs of individual stakeholders. A not-for-profit organisation needs to not only reach its clients, but also government, business partners, volunteers, other organisations, board members and internal staff.

The aim of the rebrand was to utilise the new name and tagline, as well as modernising the image of the organisation. The rebranding was accompanied by the design of new marketing materials, including brochures, factsheets, posters and website.

The presentation was extremely well received and I would like to thank the many attendees for their interest in the journey undertaken by Volunteering Western Victoria.

Alex and Julie answering questions during the presentation

Alex and Julie answering questions during the presentation

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Social Media Workshop with Leadership Great South Coast

By Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Presentations, Resources No Comments

Leadership Great South Coast is an annual leadership program provided to 25 emerging leaders from within the business, community and government sectors.  I was invited to workshop the social media component of the program.

Alex presenting at the Great South Leadership Conference

Alex presenting at the Great South Leadership Conference

Social media is used increasingly within both a personal and professional capacity. It is important for emerging leaders to have an understanding of social media and its use as an interactive communication medium.

The workshop was held in Port Fairy. I discussed several social media tools, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google+ and others.  Like any communication tool, each social media platform has its own strengths and demographics. LinkedIn, for example, is extremely useful in reaching professional networks, while Pinterest can work well for retail, fashion through the visual representation of content.

Social media is a communication platform that is used in a personal and professional capacity. It is possible to hide content but online privacy is not always guaranteed. It is always better to not share questionable content, rather than to risk it being found by employers or others. Inappropriate content  may adversely affect your reputation or that of your business or organisation.

The Port Fairy Community Services Centre

The Port Fairy Community Services Centre

Similarly, there is a need to manage a social media presence on an ongoing basis.  Social media needs to be kept up-to-date with new content, otherwise its effectiveness is hampered.  The Australian Advertising Standards Board (ASB) has recently ruled that an organisation is responsible for all content on its Facebook page, including items posted by other users.  The ruling was supported by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and requires organisations and businesses to actively manage and curate the content on their pages.

The lighthouse at Port Fairy on Griffiths Island

The lighthouse at Port Fairy on Griffiths Island

It is also important to have effective policies that can stimulate and manage discussion on social media. Organisations need to deal effectively with negative comments, taking the time to understand and transform negativity, while promptly removing offensive remarks.  Social media policies should be readily accessible to ensure that all contributors are clear on acceptable usage.

Port Fairy is an extremely picturesque town and it was fantastic to be able to share my social media experiences with aspiring leaders.

I was the first elected Councillor in Australia to utilise blogging along with social media as a communications tool. It is inspiring to be able to share this knowledge with emerging leaders.

 

Alex delivering marketing and social media essentials at Third Sector Expo 2013

Social Media Essentials at the 2013 Third Sector Expo

By Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations, Resources 2 Comments

The Third Sector Expo is an annual conference and exhibition dedicated to the not-for-profit sector.

Syneka Marketing has received regular coverage in Third Sector Magazine, providing editorial content over the past year. We were invited to speak at the 2013 Third Sector Expo.

Alex speaking at the 2013 Third Sector Exhibition and Conference

Alex speaking at the 2013 Third Sector Exhibition and Conference

I discussed social media and marketing, outlining how an organisation needs to use the right tools to reach its target markets. Social media is a marketing activity, and should be linked to the actions identified in a marketing plan.

Every not-for-profit organisation needs a marketing plan to support its organisational or corporate strategies. A corporate plan will often identify what an organisation wants to achieve and a marketing plan looks at how to achieve these outcomes.

Marketing plans need to consider the tools that are available to achieve these goals, including communication methods such as social media. Following this approach means you will be able to communicate your key messages through an online community using social media tools.

Websites and social media are only effective if they are regularly updated. This ensures that visitors are aware of your organisation’s activities. In addition, the frequency of updates is one of the metrics Google uses for search engine rankings.

Fortunately social media can be integrated with a website, ensuring consistent messages that can be published once and replicated through tools like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Integration saves time by ensuring consistency, while also providing a base level of engagement. Using this approach provides the ability to foster online communities, by encouraging committee, staff, volunteers and members to interact with the discussion.

Social media should be treated like other forms of media and covered by a communications policy. The policy should outline acceptable use of social media and identify the spokespeople who provide official comments on your organisation’s social media accounts. Guidelines should be clearly published, including on the About page on Facebook, and visible within Twitter and other social media tools.

There are several social media tools, each of which are designed for different purposes. Facebook is good for building online communities and for promoting events. Twitter is great for quick announcements, and can be linked with Facebook to provide an integrated approach. Pinterest is effective through its use of photographs, and Youtube can host video content that can promote an organisation.

Social media is increasingly prevalent across all demographics. For example, over half of Australia’s population has a Facebook account. People aged 55 plus are now the fastest growing segment of new accounts. While social media has extensive reach, email still has almost universal coverage and should be included as an online form of communication. The ability to share email content should be incorporated within newsletters to encourage recipients to forward messages through social media.

The 2013 Third Sector Expo

The 2013 Third Sector Expo

Policies should distinguish between negativity and offensiveness. Offensive comments, that denigrate, or are inflammatory should be immediately removed. Negative comments, however should be managed by seeking to engage the person that wrote the content. Try and engage the person outside of social media to prevent other comments. In particular, it is best to try and resolve the complaint in person or via the phone to remove the anonymity that social media provides. Resolving a complaint outside of social media will often lead to better outcomes and enable you to demonstrate the steps you undertook to reach a resolution.

Social media can deliver positive outcomes for an organisation, if it is linked to marketing objectives.

For example, if your goal is to raise donations, ensure that messages target prospective donors and that you encourage the sharing of content to reach their extended networks. If you are aiming to raise awareness, then promote stories that creative a narrative, outlining how your organisation achieves positive social or environmental outcomes.

Audio equipment was kindly provided by ConnectingUp. A version of the presentation with audio and slides is available through Youtube:

Or view the slides delivered to the 2013 Third Sector Expo

Thank you to the many participants who attended our presentation and for the discussion on Twitter.  A transcript of the Twitter conversation is available via Storify.

Rotary Club of Ringwood

Marketing and Rotary – Presentation to the 2013 Rotary District 9810 Conference

By Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Presentations, Resources No Comments

The Rotary Conference is an annual event designed to bring clubs across District 9810, covering Melbourne’s eastern and south-eastern suburbs, together for networking and knowledge exchange.

The conference was held in Wangaratta, and despite replacement coach services it was enjoyable weekend filled with a range of Rotary projects.

The weekend conference covered new initiatives and projects undertaken by clubs within the District. One of the sessions included Marketing and I had the privilege of presenting an overview of strategic marketing to the assembled Rotarians.

Alex Makin on stage at the Rotary District Conference in Wangaratta

Alex Makin on stage at the Rotary District Conference in Wangaratta

Rotary, like any other organisation, needs effective marketing to achieve its goals. Marketing enables individual Cubs to identify their target markets and the objectives they wish to achieve.

Marketing is broader than member recruitment and needs to encompass all potential markets of a Club, including business partners, community organisations and public support. Each of these target markets will have specific reasons for becoming involved and Clubs need to develop consistent messages to ensure a positive interaction.

Individual Rotary Clubs possess their own strengths and these should be used to develop a competitive advantage relative to other organisations. Rotary Clubs are ultimately competing for people’s time and resources. The value proposition needs to demonstrate the benefits from being associated with Rotary.

Key messages should reinforce the strengths of the Club and articulate this value proposition. For example, Clubs could demonstrate the professional skills that are gained through assisting with Rotary projects and the benefits this provides for career prospects. Similarly, Clubs can demonstrate the benefits for business partners in aligning themselves with a globally recognised brand and potential customer base.

Every form of contact someone has with the Club, whether it be through bulletins, brochures, meetings or correspondence is a form of a marketing; since an impression is left with every encounter. All marketing tools need to reinforce the key messages and develop a consistent brand image for the Club.

Alex and the presentation slides at the Rotary District 9810 Conference

Alex and the presentation slides at the Rotary District 9810 Conference

Similarly, a Club’s website and social media presence needs to complement existing forms of communication. A club should utilise a number of tools and evaluate each of them to measure their reach with the desired target market.

Inconsistency creates confusion and diminishes the ability to encourage the target market to interact with Rotary.

Rotary is a high involvement product, it requires a significant commitment from individuals and a consistent image helps to ensure top of mind awareness. In addition, encouraging involvement in projects can assist in recruiting members for specific tasks and to demonstrate the outcomes they can achieve.

The District Conference is a great opportunity to meet fellow Rotarians and to discuss ideas, it is great to see marketing being considered as part of the program fixture.

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Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector – Day Two

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Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

Day Two of GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector

Today is the second day of the GOV49 Communication Delivery and Social Media in the Public Sector conference. Yesterday I chaired the proceedings and delivered a presentation on the use of social media for advocacy campaigns.

Today’s sessions looked at the day-to-day usage of social media, through government programs and in emergency management. Insights included the New Zealand earthquake where social media was used to disseminate information and provide updates on the recovery efforts. The presentation also discussed the importance of keeping backup information, particularly when electricity and computer networks are unavailable.

My presentation looked at the various social media tools and how they can be utilized to assist the public sector in being able to engage the community. I looked at the most prominent tools, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and discussed their strengths and potential usability for the public sector. Like most technologies, social media is increasingly being used across all age demographics, with people aged 5 plus being the fastest growing users of Facebook.

Email still has an essential role in reaching communities and the number of email accounts overshadows the use of social media. Email, like most other tools, can be integrated, providing the option to share content via Facebook, Twitter or other networks.

Integrating these tools saves time by reducing duplication and the need to write multiple content. In addition, the use of sharing assists in promotion by encouraging recipients to distribute content through their networks.

While it is imperative that there are clear guidelines and policies for social media usage, this should not be used to deter its usage within an organisation. There should be the clear identification of official spokespeople and individuals should use social media to support these official roles.

The official spokespeople should be the people that respond to difficult situations and seek to resolve these issues. It is often advisable to resolve situations outside of social media by demonstrating a responsive approach and following up with additional details if required.

Social media can be used effectively by the government and the public sector. Ultimately it is important that the public sector is part of the conversation that occurs on social media so that it can respond and be part of this discussion.

The community will be discussing government and policies and the public sector should be part of this discussion, just as it is within traditional media outlets.

The two-day conference provided several insights and examples of social media within the public sector.