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case studies Archives - Syneka Marketing

Guest Lecturing for the Australian College of Sports and Fitness

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The Australian College of Sports and Fitness is a Registered Training Organisation, delivering accredited courses focusing on health and wellbeing.  I was invited to deliver a guest lecture on marketing to Diploma students.

Sports marketing continues to experience strong growth, and it was great to speak directly to students who are either planning on forming their own business or exploring marketing related roles in the sports sector.

My session discussed the customer experience that is created through the marketing mix, as well as the need to align business goals with marketing outcomes. We explored several case studies that highlighted the need for an integrated marketing approach, including examples such as the poorly executed Woolworths ANZAC Campaign, which failed to adequately risk and the overarching brand experience.

Guest lecturing provides an opportunity to share knowledge with current students and to provide an insight into the real world application of marketing. I wish the students well as they progress towards completing their studies.

April in review: Measuring marketing performance

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In April we discussed the topic of assessing marketing performance.

Assessing performance is an important part of ensuring you stay on track with your marketing. Marketing is not an esoteric concept and can in fact be measured effectively.

To measure your marketing performance start by looking at your goals and plan your metrics accordingly. Think about the value of the aspects being measured. For example, measuring the number of hits to your website is meaningless when the real value is in the number of website visitors that interact with your business and respond to your call to action.

Once you have understood what you want to measure, make sure you track your progress. This can be done by setting up processes and tools such as a CRM, which can track the progress of your marketing tactics. Ensure that you measure your performance at set intervals so you can make valid comparisons and analyse information.

We believe that success starts with strategy and that a marketing plan can provide you with the information you need to effectively measure your marketing activities.

In April we also featured some case studies on metrics, which included looking at Woolworth’s “Fresh in our memories” campaign. If the right metrics were used for this campaign, it never would have been implemented in the way that it was.

In May we will be covering the topic of marketing resources, so stay tuned to our social media and blogging presence to learn more.

We look forward to staying engaged with you and will see you next month.

Putting Plans into Action

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In March we covered the topic of putting plans into action.Sound planning is essential, but so is implementation as you need to achieve the results you have identified.

  • Firstly you need to undertake your research. Without research it is difficult to determine your position in the market and identify your value proposition.
  • Secondly, a plan requires resources. It is important to determine your requirements to implement the plan effectively and to consider how you can leverage personnel across your business effectively.
  • Lastly, make sure you commence implementing your plan. Results will only be seen if you turn your plan into action.

In March we explored some case studies that identified how plans were put into action. The Salvation Army South Africa and its domestic violence awareness campaign, through #thedress, is an example of sound campaign planning and implementation. While Seek’s #makeitcount campaign was an example of a great idea – inspiring Australians to go out there and find their dream job, it fell short in terms of implementation. Ultimately this campaign was off message and lacked the innovation that is often seen in Seek’s campaigns.

During March we also conducted our first Re-imaging Marketing workshop at the NAB Village. This workshop attracted a diverse range of participants and explored how business goals need to link to marketing outcomes. Planning should be undertaken prior to any tactical components.

In April we will be covering the topic of assessing marketing implementation. Stay tuned to our social media platforms, newsletter and blog to stay informed.

Re-imagining Marketing – Our First Workshop for 2015

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Marketing is unfortunately one of the most misunderstood terms in business. For far too long, the term has become corrupted, due to a focus on execution, rather than strategy.

Marketing does not exist for the sake of itself, instead it is about providing the strategic direction and planning framework that enables you to expand the capacity of your business.

Alex guiding particpants through re-imaging Marketing

Alex guiding participants through re-imaging Marketing

To assist in re-defining what marketing is, we have launched our workshop series, ‘Reimagining Marketing – Make Marketing Work for You’. The first of these workshops was delivered this morning with our partners at the NABVillage.

Through this workshop we conveyed the true definition of marketing, being one that creates value and enables you to expand your capacity into the future. We explored our award winning strategic planning framework, built upon the solid foundation of capturing the right information, gaining insights that inform your strategic direction and delivering the actions that meet your goals.

Natalia and I co-presented the workshop, and it was fantastic to see the insightful discussion and willingness of participants to share their perceptions and experiences with marketing. We worked through several real-life case studies to explore how a strategic approach to marketing facilitates business growth.

Natalia discussing the foundations of a marketing plan

Natalia discussing the foundations of a marketing plan

We explored the key elements of a marketing plan, exploring current and future trends, as well as how to respond to competitive pressures and a changing context. Once your plan is confirmed, it is then a matter of executing the elements and providing a measurable approach that lets you evaluate results.

Marketing creates value for a business by aligning your business plan with marketing outcomes. We will be delivering several workshops over the course of 2015 so we can re-imagine marketing to ensure it delivers value and a positive impact.

For a further discussion on marketing0, please download our complementary eBook, ‘What is Marketing?’ This eBook includes worksheets to assist you in articulating your value proposition and the strategic direction of your business.

Being Strategic

Being Strategic Through Marketing

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In February, through our blogging and social media presence, we covered the need for businesses to be strategic.

We began by looking at the SWOT analysis. We discussed the importance of using this tool to draw insights about your business. We followed this by explaining some case studies that demonstrated where marketers have used insights to deliver campaigns that effectively reach their target market.

We ended the month by going back to the basics and discussed the need to redefine marketing. A professional marketer can provide you with the right strategies to grow your business and this drives our passion to redefine marketing.

In March we will be covering the topic of transforming plans into action. Stay tuned for more from our video series.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

Marketing isn’t Dead, but it does need to be redefined

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Last week The Harvard Business Review Online published an article ‘Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’, which, due to its sensationalist headline was quickly circulated via social media.

While I normally wouldn’t respond to such content, the fact that it has been published on a reputable online platform, and came up in several conversations over the week, has led me to revisit how marketing does need to be redefined.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

There is a need to redefine marketing based on definitions adopted by peak marketing associations.

While the author claims that the Chief Marketing Officer should be replaced by the Chief Loyalty Officer, there is a failure to recognise that loyalty is created through a brand, which is executed through a marketing plan.

As a result, the premise is incorrect, given that the author defines marketing as “selling products”, and not the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large (American Marketing Association, Definition of Marketing, Approved July 2013), which is a viewpoint shared by the Australian Marketing Institute.

Furthermore, the case studies, which cite Chioptle and Apple, fail to recognise the role of marketing in creating the value proposition that fosters ongoing customer loyalty.

Apple has strong consumer loyalty, due to its disruptive approach to technology, which encompasses quality, design, ease of use, as well as an ecosystem that serves to cross-sell and support complementary products. This loyalty was fostered through a marketing approach that executed each of these elements in a consistent and seamless manner. What Apple has done well is determine its strategic marketing direction and follow this through with execution. The few times this execution has been underwhelming, there has been a negative reaction to its overall brand value. As an example, the replacement of Google Maps, with Apple Maps, which at the time did not meet the perception of quality, demonstrated how an inconsistent approach adversely impacted the brand and marketing approach.

Loyalty is not created, it is initiated through a strategic marketing plan that recognises the importance of customers. These customers serve as evangelists, and in turn stimulate repeat purchases, as well as support complementary products or services. Apple in devising its approach to the iPod and iPhone, would have recognised that its customers, and in particularly its niche in design, were an existing strength.

The narrow viewpoint of marketing is unfortunately far too common. What is unexpected, however is when a reputable platform, such as the Harvard Business Review, publishes such views.

Marketing begins with strategy. This strategic direction identifies the value proposition and the marketing mix that is required to achieve these outcomes. For many businesses loyalty is a direction that is part of this mix.

Marketing does need to be redefined, primarily because far too many people have been able to claim that they are ‘marketers’, without adhering to a professional standard. The author of ‘ Marketing Is Dead, and Loyalty Killed It’ is a clear example of this.