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campaigns Archives - Syneka Marketing

Visit Brisbane ad

Is it Visit Brisbane or Visit Melbourne?

By | Government | No Comments

As a strategic marketing agency it is our role to assist clients in determining their unique value proposition, which in turn informs their target markets and marketing mix. Over the break I encountered this billboard at Southern Cross Station:

 

At first, I thought that it was perhaps an advertisement for a restaurant at South Warf, given it is approximately 1 kilometre from Southern Cross Station and has almost the exact same look and feel as this advertisement.

On closer inspection, I realised that this was not an advertisement for South Warf, but for Brisbane.

Visit Brisbane ad

Visit Brisbane ad

Brisbane, unlike other areas in Queensland, is the urban centre, with a population of 2.3 million. It doesn’t have the glitzy beaches and hotels like the Gold Coast or the pristine scenery of the Whitsunday’s; and in many ways it is a lot like Melbourne.

Brisbane Marketing is the official tourism organisation for Brisbane, with one of its goals to increase interstate tourism from Melbourne. Unfortunately, this campaign has not understood this target audience.

South Warf Melbourne

South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

There is no point creating a tourism campaign that looks like it was shot in Melbourne and then sold to people in Melbourne, when they can get the same experience walking 12 minutes from Southern Cross Station.

Tourism exists to generate a return, and while this campaign goes beyond the typical flora and fauna approach it does not look at how to position Brisbane’s strengths relative to Melbourne.

We encourage Brisbane Marketing to look strategically at their target audiences and start creating campaigns that these audiences with value.

Asking the wrong question: The Taxi Industry receives feedback via Twitter

Ask the wrong questions, get the wrong answers – Exploring the YourTaxis Campaign

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, News | 2 Comments

It is unfortunately for too common for businesses to ask the wrong questions when seeking marketing support. This perpetuates the ineffective tactics led approach to marketing, which ultimately diminishes returns due to a lack of consistency with the desired strategic direction.

We often see this when a business is seeking website modifications, social media content or a branding refresh. There is the assumption that these isolated tactics will result in business growth, rather than the question being ‘how do we ensure consistency across the marketing experience and throughout each stage of the customer journey’.

Social media in itself will not foster customer loyalty or engagement if the customer base is not receptive to this medium. Similarly, a website will not result in new business if the processes behind the site are cumbersome or unwieldy.

Often there is need to dig beyond tactics to discover the broader marketing questions that need to be answered. Specifically, there the need to consider how each tactic should reinforce the customer journey to culminate in an experience that fosters outcomes.

We saw this earlier this year with Woolworths failing to consider the ramifications of its Fresh in Our Memories Campaign, and more recently with @YourTaxis, a social media campaign that failed in its attempt to shift public perceptions of the taxi industry.

Woolworths asking the wrong questions: The Fresh in Our Memories Campaign

Woolworths asking the wrong questions: The Fresh in Our Memories Campaign

While Woolworths should have had the resources, foresight and capability to think through the ramifications. The client of the YourTaxis campaign was a not-for-profit membership organisation that would have limited resources and failed to ask the right questions.

The Taxi industry, which has traditionally had few direct competitors, is now under significant pressure from Uber, despite the ride sharing service being somewhat legally ambiguous under current Victorian legislation. The Taxi Industry has responded by been undertaking advocacy efforts to review Uber given current legislation.

Uber has significant strengths in social media and strong online loyalty, aspects that are not shared by the taxi industry. A tactics based approach resulted in the YourTaxis campaign simply replicating what had worked for Uber, despite the high element of risk. The campaign failed on any discernible metric, with Twitter users complaining about Taxis and many complementing Uber within the same Tweet.

Asking the wrong question: The Taxi Industry receives feedback via Twitter

Asking the wrong question: The Taxi Industry receives feedback via Twitter

The question that should have been asked was ‘how do we improve the perception of taxis to assist in influencing the political debate?’ Had this question been asked, a social media campaign focused on soliciting public views would have never been considered.

A strategic marketing approach would have asked the right questions: focusing on all elements rather than just promotions

A strategic marketing approach would have asked the right questions: focusing on all elements of the marketing mix rather than just promotions

Answering the right question would resulted in a substantially different campaign:

  • There would be a focus on service delivery, highlighting improvements, such as driver training and standards, as well as streamlining the complaints process.
  • Promotional campaigns would have focused on the role of taxis as a form of transport to an audience of State MPs and other decision makers, rather than end users.
  • A public component could have been explored through the hopes and aspirations of taxi drivers, with the aim of building personal rapport with the sector.

Answering the right question would have resulted in a campaign focused on the entire marketing mix, with stakeholders including passengers and policy makers. Alignment between each element in the marketing mix, particularly the service, processes and people elements would have enhanced the industry’s standing.

A strategic approach to marketing ensures the right questions are being asked, so you can reach the right answers. Unfortunately in this case, the wrong question was asked twice, with a second campaign on Remembrance Day resulting in further criticism through social media.

Asking the wrong question twice: The YourTaxis Tweet on remembrance Day

Asking the wrong question twice: The YourTaxis Tweet on Remembrance (not Rememberance) Day

The end result is an industry that now has a harder time influencing debate and decision makers, as well as a not-for-profit membership based association that most likely has diminished standing with its members. It is a shame when time, money and reputation is thrown away simply because the wrong questions were asked.

PS We attempted to reach out to the Agency that initiated the YourTaxis campaign to explore their perspective. We received no response.

The original call to action

When a lack of strategy creates trouble – Woolworth’s Fresh in our Memories Campaign

By | Advice for Businesses, News | 3 Comments

With ANZAC day just over a week away, Woolworth’s has found itself in an uncomfortable predicament. In an attempt to commemorate the upcoming centenary of ANZAC day, Woolworth’s commissioned Carrspace, an experiential marketing agency to create a campaign that would capture the ANZAC spirt and align it with the Woolworth’s brand.

What was delivered was a flawed concept that the Internet captured and transformed into a meme. The concept provided by Carrspace was a website that enabled users to upload images of their loved ones who have fought in wars, with stylised watermarked text that read “Least we forget ANZAC 1915-2015 Fresh In Our Memories Woolworths”. Users had the option of uploading any image they desired and then sharing via social media accounts.

The original call to action

The original call to action

This was the problem. It did not take long for users to start uploading other imagery, often associated with memes such as Grumpy Cat and the Fresh Price of Bell Air.

 

A meme version featuring Grumpy Cat

A meme version featuring Grumpy Cat

A meme version featuring the Fresh Prince of Bell-Air

A meme version featuring the Fresh Prince of Bell-Air

While Woolworths is currently reeling from the reputational damaged caused by this campaign, the agency Carrspace has also found itself in the spotlight with memes directly making fun of the agency and its lack of strategic direction.

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

This campaign is yet another example of where a lack of strategy created poor outcomes. There were no discernible metrics and no effective assessment of the perception that would be created through attaching the Woolworths tagline to Anzac memories.

With the right strategy, marketing can be measured. Had Carrspace taken a strategic approach, it would have been able to assess the risks of the campaign and determine if it was viable. Carrspace is an experiential marketing agency that delivers campaigns to its clients through creative tactics. It is not a provider of strategic marketing services. This is a clear example of a campaign that appeared to have no discernible outcome, yet has caused potential risk to both the agency and the client.

Ultimately #freshinourmemories is an example of a retailer utilising an agency that focuses on tactics before thinking about the strategy and their strategic direction. Unfortunately such outcomes tarnish the wider perception of marketing and once again erode the fact that a sound marketing methodology would have fully understood the potential risks around such a campaign.

From experience into engagement – how do we measure outcomes?

By | Advice for Businesses, Resources | No Comments

Last week, we featured feedback from Janet of Port Places, highlighting how the Royal Botanical Garden was utilising Twitter to manage experiences around TitanArum, one of its key exhibits.

This week Walter from Kinship, has offered his views, particularly in the need to link the social media presence to broader outcomes:

  1. What now happens to the Twitter feed – it has to be managed into a coma or in some way resources directed to it to manage it while the flower is dead.
  2. What happens to the followers of the flower? Are they now encouraged to move to @RBG_Melbourne – are they the same, are they different – what resources now need to be put into maintaining a relationship with the flower followers?

The better alternative would have been to simply use a #titanarum hashtag on the main feed which would have avoided all these issues and maintained continuity with the subscriber base with no extra effort.

People always have bright ideas about starting new campaigns, but rarely think about what happens after the campaign and how the results will be harvested and relationships continued.

Walter raises some valid points. Firstly, there is a need to understand the desired outcomes from the campaign. One aspect is engagement over TitanArum, but the broader focus should be on fostering ongoing interest and participation with the Royal Botanical Gardens. As a result, there is a need to measure conversions between followers of @TitanArum through to @RBG_Melbourne. Secondly how many of these become attendees of the Gardens, or promote the activities more broadly? Furthermore, how many commit to a membership or ongoing participation?

Following a theme or campaign is often the first stage to broader engagement and should not be seen as the end result.

Walter’s comments provide a brilliant introduction to the theme we will be exploring this month. Specifically, how you should be measuring marketing outcomes.

Putting Plans into Action

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

In March we covered the topic of putting plans into action.Sound planning is essential, but so is implementation as you need to achieve the results you have identified.

  • Firstly you need to undertake your research. Without research it is difficult to determine your position in the market and identify your value proposition.
  • Secondly, a plan requires resources. It is important to determine your requirements to implement the plan effectively and to consider how you can leverage personnel across your business effectively.
  • Lastly, make sure you commence implementing your plan. Results will only be seen if you turn your plan into action.

In March we explored some case studies that identified how plans were put into action. The Salvation Army South Africa and its domestic violence awareness campaign, through #thedress, is an example of sound campaign planning and implementation. While Seek’s #makeitcount campaign was an example of a great idea – inspiring Australians to go out there and find their dream job, it fell short in terms of implementation. Ultimately this campaign was off message and lacked the innovation that is often seen in Seek’s campaigns.

During March we also conducted our first Re-imaging Marketing workshop at the NAB Village. This workshop attracted a diverse range of participants and explored how business goals need to link to marketing outcomes. Planning should be undertaken prior to any tactical components.

In April we will be covering the topic of assessing marketing implementation. Stay tuned to our social media platforms, newsletter and blog to stay informed.

Seek’s new marketing campaign – an example of a brand becoming too comfortable and losing its focus

By | News | No Comments

A few years ago I wrote a post about the state of University advertising and how at the time it failed to inspire. Recently, I was quite surprised to see that Seek was following a similar style to these advertisements.

Seek was one of the first businesses in Australia to succeed as a disruptive start up. The impact of Seek has been prolific, it has been able to transform the job market and in doing so, it has demonstrated how technology adds value for both job seekers and employers.

Against many odds, including the international players in the market, Seek has become the market leader as source for finding jobs and recruiting positions.

In the past, Seek undertook a cheeky and innovative approach to advertising, creating campaigns that were witty and clever. Now it appears as Seek has grown, it has changed this approach.

A past campaign

A past campaign

A play on words Source: Smart

A play on words Source: Smart

Seek in its latest campaign, has decided have focused on photographing a series of people, both young and old, who want change in their lives. The tag line “make it count” has been used to reinforce the change. While advocating for Australians to go out there and change their lives, the implementation of this campaign has been poor.

The subjects used in the photography all have serious and unhappy looks on their faces, almost analogous to individuals in not-for-profit advertising, portraying that they have been hard-done-by. These advertisements do not connect with those of us who may be unhappy in our jobs and are looking for a change. Instead the people in these advertisements seem stuck and unable to escape the situations that they are in, reinforcing that sometimes life isn’t fair.

One of the advertisement at a tram stop

One of the advertisement at a tram stop

 

Seek's Make it Count campaign

Seek’s Make it Count campaign

Universities in this country have the advantage of being in a market where there is strong demand. They also do not have an extensive number of competitors and can sometimes, unfortunately make do with poorly implemented marketing campaigns. Seek on the other hand cannot.

With the technology sector consistently building on its innovations, Seek cannot afford to become comfortable. Seek was able to become a market leader because it took risks, focused on being innovative and demonstrated its value to the Australian public. It seems to have forgotten this strategic approach.

We would encourage Seek to revisit their strategy to ensure they continue to position themselves as a market leader and innovator.