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business Archives - Syneka Marketing

We are redefining marketing – hear us speak at two upcoming events

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Resources | No Comments

Our vision is to redefine marketing and we do this by delivering measurable and accountable marketing outcomes through the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .
Throughout June we will be presenting at several key events to highlight the role of marketing and the need for marketing to step up and deliver outcomes that reinforce organisational goals.

Webinar: Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance

On Wednesday the 8th of June we will be hosting Redefining Your Marketing – how you can measure and improve your returns and performance, a feature webinar hosted by ProBono Australia.

Not-for-profit organisations are facing immense pressure to become market responsive and yet marketing remains widely misunderstood in the not-for-profit sector.
This one hour webinar will assist not-for-profit organisations in developing a strategic approach to marketing. We will explore the sequencing and touchpoints required to enhance the stakeholder experience and explore the framework required to instill effective marketing governance and accountabilities.

Attend this session to ensure an alignment between marketing outcomes and organisational goals and generate a positive return from marketing resources.

Register through EventBrite to attend this session for Wednesday the 8th of June at 2pm. Pricing is $55 for individuals and $300 for organisations (with unlimited staff access).

The Business Seesaw at the Melbourne Brekkie Club

On Thursday the 9th of June we will be presenting at the Very Melbourne Brekkie Club, through the Melbourne Business Network in a collaboration with Paul Ostaff, from our management consulting partner, Reignite Consulting.

Join us as we discuss the Business Seesaw, as we explore the infrastructure required for businesses to build their operational and marketing capacity. Many businesses struggle to balance the need for business growth through marketing and service. Reignite Consulting and Syneka Marketing will be outlining our framework for businesses to achieve operational and marketing excellence.

Details and registration is available via EventBrite and is open to members of the Melbourne Business Network.

Brand and marketing – how they fit together

By | News | One Comment

There is an increasing level of confusion between branding and marketing, with the two terms often being used interchangeably to communicate the visual or strategic objectives of a business.

We have come across many businesses and organisations recently, that have undertaken branding and marketing in the reverse order. This has resulted in a brand being created without a marketing plan, often then requiring the brand to altered when the strategic rigour provided within the marketing plan identifies misalignment.

Branding is a potential output of the strategic marketing planning process and not the other way around. At the base level, a brand enables the differentiation of one business from another, providing a conduit that builds common ground between stakeholders and personnel within the business.

The marketing planning process determines the overall marketing direction of the business. Branding and identity is a potential output and tactic that may be considered. If this is the case then a brand strategy is created which determines the attributes and essence of the brand, as well as guideline around the brand name, presence and brand promise. From this comes the visual identity and complementary creative materials that support the communication of the brand.

With marketing being ill defined, it can be easy for businesses to become confused between the two terms. This is compounded by the fact that Australia is dominated by tacticians of marketing such as the digital agency, creative agency or advertising agency.

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For non-marketers, particularly those on boards, it can be easy to take the branding option first rather than to invest in a marketing plan. Often a marketing tactician will show visual examples of their work and draft concepts, causing boards and other decision makers to often ask the wrong questions and hence confuse branding for marketing.

The strategic insights through marketing should always be the first aspect you consider when you look at your marketing mix. Once this step is undertaken, you can then consider what is required to develop a brand that resonates with your marketing direction.

Syneka Marketing announced as sponsor for Club 3004

By | Advice for Businesses, News, Resources | No Comments

Club 3004 is the premiere business network stretching from the Bay to the Boulevard, encompassing the Cities of Melbourne, Port Phillip and Stonington.

As a business in South Melbourne we are pleased to announce our sponsorship and support of Club 3004. We will be assisting Club 3004 in its strategic direction and marketing capabilities, through a marketing plan that facilities value and growth.

Club 3004 hosts regular events, covering professional development and networking. For details please visit Club 3004.

Do not overlook your products and services

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

The marketing mix, or customer experience, forms the foundation of a strategic marketing approach. Each element within the mix needs to be considered from a strategic perspective to ensure alignment between business goals, market value and marketing outcomes.

While many businesses understand the core of what they offer, they often overlook the other attributes that consist of their product or service. A product or service will typically have three core components:

  1. The Core  – the fundamental need you provide. The core is the generic need that that is fulfilled by utilising your product or service. For example in hospitality you are satisfying hunger, or shelter for accommodation. This is often cited as one of the reasons for the failure of Kodak, since it failed to consider that its products provide story telling or memories, not photography.
  2. Actual product – the tangible components that customers interact with. This is the physical configuration of the product or service, including packaging, staff interaction and the product itself. Hospitality incorporates the setting of the restaurant, cuisine selection and attitudes of staff. In the case of Kodak, the product included the film quality, packaging and store interaction. Had Kodak considered its product as storytelling or memories, then the actual product would have encompassed digital storage, cameras and photography sharing.
  3. Augmented product – additional components you can offer to differentiate yourself from competitors, which reinforce your value proposition. A fine dining restaurant may incorporate an additional course in a degustation menu for regular customers, while a hotel may offer valet parking or extended check outs.
Product components

A product consists of many components – all of them need to be part of the marketing mix

Failing to incorporate a holistic view of your products or services will cause fragmentation within the marketing mix and diminish outcomes. Marketing needs visibility and influence into product development and service composition to ensure alignment across each element of the marketing mix.

Marketing Governance: Mitigating reputational and financial risks

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News | No Comments

Good governance needs to underpin all aspects of a business or organisation and this holds true for marketing. Unfortunately, marketing governance tends to be substantially underdeveloped, with blurred responsibilities and a lack of sufficient oversight.

The most evident examples are seen in social media, where a lack of oversight and a failure to link execution with strategic direction, has resulted in significant public mistakes by businesses (including large businesses like Woolworths and McDonalds), as well as not-for-profit organisations (as evidenced through the failed YourTaxis campaign).

Marketing Governance defines the roles and responsibilities of the marketing function, by considering three core elements:

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  1. Level 1: Executive – Leadership and Direction – Marketing leadership and strategic direction needs to be established at an executive level. This is often the Chief Marketing Officer and the Executive Team, or a combination of the board and Executive Officer within not-for-profit organisations. The strategic marketing direction needs to be consistent with the organisation’s vision.  In particular, the entire marketing mix needs to be considered, to ensure that marketing has visibility and suitable influence across the organisation. Suitable structures should be developed to support the need for marketing to be integrated into other business areas.
  1. Level 2: Management – Accountability and Oversight – Management is accountable for delivering the strategies that will achieve the goals established through the marketing plan. Management should determine the appropriate activities and tactics (within budget and resource parameters) that will collectively achieve the identified direction. Management is responsible for oversight across these activities to ensure consistency and to evaluate results. Management should be empowered to not only measure marketing performance, but to adjust these activities if the expected outcomes are not being realised. As a result, management must be able to measure marketing performance and be fully aware of the customer journey and sequencing that is required to motivate action.
  1. Level 3: Implementation – Execution – Execution is where relevant marketing tactics are undertaken based on the decisions made by management. The execution layer can involve internal teams, external partners or a combined approach, but should always have a clear understanding of the outcomes required. It is imperative that execution activities are briefed correctly and that inputs and outputs are not mistaken for marketing outcomes. Management needs oversight over execution to ensure that outcomes are consistent and delivering anticipated results. Measuring marketing performance enables adjustments and to ensure that all execution elements are working as intended.

Marketing Governance is an area that is far too often overlooked, but is required to ensure the evaluation of marketing performance and to reduce reputational and financial risk.

Marketing, as a function, and organisations overall, need to develop capabilities in marketing governance so we can finally see an end to mistakes that never should have occurred in the first place, had oversight and direction been suitably established.

Embedding rigour into marketing – through our Performance Framework

By | Advice for Businesses | One Comment

It is easy to spend time and money on marketing, but a lot harder to ensure that your resources actually deliver a positive impact. As a result, marketing often becomes unaccountable, delivering tactics that generate activity, but underperform in regard to anticipated outcomes.

These issues are due to marketing being undertaken as distinct operational tasks, rather than a core strategic function that secures business growth. Consequently, marketing often lacks a presence at an executive or board room level, despite the reputational and financial risks created through a lack of strategic insight.

Overview of the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology

Ultimately, marketing is designed to strengthen business capacity, yet this is often lacking within marketing itself.

The Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology is designed to embed rigour into marketing, through data analysis, strategic insights and evaluation. As a result, the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology consists of four key modules that have defined methodologies:

  • The Audit – forms the foundations of all marketing projects, by reviewing existing activities and assessing performance.
  • The Forecast – assesses future market conditions, guiding the development of campaign plans and product innovations.
  • The Plan – aligns marketing outcomes with business goals, through implementation schedules that guide and measure marketing activities.
  • Execution – the delivery of marketing outcomes, as per the defined timeframes, with all activities being evaluated on the required outcomes.

Our services, encompassing consulting, workshops, training and management are aligned in accordance with our Framework to ensure transparency and accountability. For further information, view our Guide to the Syneka Marketing Performance Methodology .