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brochure Archives - Syneka Marketing

Deliver Results through Marketing Implementation

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Government, News | No Comments

Marketing implementation is the ongoing execution of your marketing activities. This phase should only be undertaken once you have completed your marketing plan, as this will identify what types of marketing will be most effective for your business.

The first stage when executing any marketing activities, is the development of an implementation schedule.

Develop a schedule of when tasks need to be completed and work backwards to identify when they should commence. Identify which activities are dependent on others, so that tasks are able to be completed as required. For example, a brand and visual identity will be required before developing brochures or a website. Developing a brochure without a brand will result in diminished outcomes.

Marketing implementation can take many forms and ultimately depends on your products or services, your target markets and your available resources. Branding, logos, media engagement, websites, business development and the sales process are all aspects that should be considered as part of marketing implementation. Each of these marketing tools will influence purchase decisions and your target markets, so your marketing plan should be used as a guide to ensure consistency and relevancy.

The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities. The marketing methodology includes the key phases of your marketing activities.

Marketing implementation will often require the ability to work on multiple tasks simultaneously. Some tasks, such as attending networking events or workshop sessions, may be ongoing and you will need to manage these activities while working on other items.

Most of the identified marketing activities should be interconnected, so you can develop a consistent approach and leverage each outcome. Interconnectedness will strengthen your overall marketing messages, since each activity should reinforce the value proposition you identified in your marketing plan. Ensuring a consistent approach you enable you to develop a narrative that clearly articulates your value proposition and the outcomes you provide.

Your marketing plan will also assist in being able to measure results. Consider the purpose of each marketing activity, who it is that you want to reach, how you will reach them and what outcomes you are anticipating. All forms of marketing can be measured, including offline methods. Consider the use of tracking codes, or specific telephone numbers to measure the effectiveness of brochures and leaflets.  Also remember that often a customer will require a number of contact points before responding, gain an understanding of which tools and messages resonated with them.

A strategic approach to marketing implementation, through the marketing planning process, prevents a hit or miss approach to marketing. Ultimately this saves you money and time because you have a clear understanding of what is required to achieve your business goals.

Setting Effective Marketing Budgets

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

As the new financial year approaches, it is timely to consider how you can set a marketing budget that will achieve your goals over the next twelve months.

Budgets are a measurement tool that ensure you can adequately manage revenue and expenditure. Similarly, you also need to identify how you will measure the impact of your marketing activities.

Setting a marketing budget may seem like guesswork, but with the right information you can set a realistic budget.

  1. Firstly, ensure you have clearly defined goals for the next twelve months. A business plan should be guiding the development of your business, supported by a marketing plan that shows how to achieve these outcomes. These plans should identify the actions that will be undertaken each year.
  2. Secondly, you need to consider how you will achieve these outcomes. While your strategic plans should identify potential actions, these need to be reviewed to ensure that they are relevant and achievable. A marketing audit can assist by providing a health check on your marketing activities.

Consider how customers find your businesses and interact with your products or services. Are you leveraging these marketing tools as effectively as possible? For example, are you integrating these activities to save time while extending your reach?

Instant time savings can be created through integrating your website updates with social media, providing a consistent approach while also providing ongoing activity. Offline materials can be streamlined through a consistent identity guide that determines the visual elements of collateral like brochures and leaflets.

Consider the budgeted amounts for each of these materials and their value in attracting and retaining customers.  Do these marketing activities assist in not only obtaining customers, but also other goals, such as differentiating your products or services?  For example, speaking at conferences or providing editorial content may not generate immediate sales, but can build longer ongoing credibility and demonstrate expertise.

Also don’t forget that word of mouth referrals are a form of marketing. What actions can you undertake to encourage recommendations? Asking people to refer your products and services is always a good start and may prompt someone to take action.

Knowing how you measure your marketing activities will assist in setting effective budgets that will guide the financial performance of your business.

 

Inside Small Business

Inside Small Business: Success Starts With a Marketing Plan

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses | 2 Comments

Syneka Marketing is featured in the April edition of Inside Small Business, where we discuss the importance of
marketing plans
and why they are essential for businesses.

Every viable business needs a marketing plan. A
marketing plan
shows you how to achieve the goals you have set to grow and develop your business.

Marketing is one of the most misunderstood words in business. Marketing is more than sales, advertising, logos, promotion or processes – it is about leveraging these tactics to achieve your goals.


Marketing starts with strategy
. A marketing plan considers your business and sets goals that are realistic and achievable. Marketing lets you identify new opportunities, as well as grow revenue. A marketing plan identifies potential target markets and the best methods to reach these customers. Once you understand your potential customers,
the plan
will identify what tasks need to be undertaken, the budget for these activities and the outcomes to measure success.

A new logo, brochure or social-media presence is not marketing. Marketing is when the logo is used to create a brand, providing an identity that can be reinforced with brochures, websites or Twitter accounts. Marketing is created through the strategy that identifies the right communication channels, messages and visual identity to reach your target markets.

Marketing also considers how you can scale your processes and operations to accommodate future growth. There is little merit in starting a new sales campaign if you are unable to respond to these potential customers. Ensure that staff can accommodate new demand and can assist potential customers who may be unfamiliar with your products and services.

Marketing activities must be measurable and a marketing plan allows you set the outcomes you want to achieve. For example, if it recommends that a brochure reaches your target market, then the response that it generates must be measured. Likewise, measure how people navigate through your website and the items that generate the most interest. If something doesn’t work then you have the option of refining these activities to achieve the outcomes you want.

A marketing plan creates a positive return on investment so you can achieve revenue growth. Before spending money on marketing or sales, make sure you have a marketing plan that shows you how you can achieve your goals and grow your business.

Adequate planning will help ensure you can secure a strong attendance to your event

Time matters when planning events

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Having adequate time to plan your event, may mean the difference between success and failure.

An effective event requires detailed planning and processes.  When you have limited time it is difficult to undertake adequate promotion, which is required to secure strong attendance.

Marketing your event can be complex and depends on who you want to target. Emails need to be worded correctly and succinctly to communicate the purpose of the event. Brochures and flyers should be designed in a way that complements the other branding you use. You also may need to decide how you will use social media to promote your event.

Generally promotion works best when there is a strategy, and is undertaken with sufficient time. While you may be excited about your event, others will need information on the details and may need to be reminded many times (through various communication mediums) before they confirm their attendance.

Adequate planning will help ensure you can secure a strong attendance to your event

Adequate planning will help ensure you can secure a strong attendance to your event

Ideally you should have about two to three months to plan an event. This provides enough time to find quality suppliers, to confirm attendance lists and to develop a promotional strategy that maximises what is being offered.

Having sufficient time also enables you to assess the effectiveness of your event. For example, it may be difficult to understand why your event did not sell, if you only had two weeks to promote it. However if you had two months to promote an event and it was unsuccessful, you could adequately assess if the communication tools you used were effective, or if your event matched the interests of who you were targeting.

Always remember that planning events in advance enables effective implementation.

Member Renewals: Make it Clear… and Interesting

By | Advice, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

Achieving a high rate of membership renewals should be a goal for any membership organisation. Membership renewal letters should be considered a key marketing tool and not just a tax invoice.

The following advice led to an organisation being able to increase its membership renewals to 98%:

  • An attention grabbing headline stating a clear benefit for renewing now.
  • An opening paragraph which instilled a sense of urgency and interest in renewing.
  • A series of benefit statements, listed in bullet point format, that gave compelling reasons why the member should renew.
  • An offer for early renewal (not a huge offer, but something of value to ‘early birds’). This was in the form of a ‘PS’ at the bottom of the page.
  • A call to action at the end of the letter, making it easy for the person to renew.
  • A brochure outlining a member-get-member program, and a reward for introducing a new member (leverage word of mouth marketing and encourage members to recruit their peers)

The result? The organisation gained more renewals before their deadline than ever before. They gained a huge number of new member applications.

The 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, News, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

The National Conference on Volunteering is a peak annual event for volunteer involving organisations across Australia. The event was organised by Volunteering Australia and hosted by Volunteering SA&NT.

Our Managing Director Alex prepares for his presentation at the 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

Our Managing Director Alex prepares for his presentation at the 2013 National Conference on Volunteering

The Conference had four key themes:

  • Lead – to encourage inspirational leadership
  • Partner – collaboration to achieve results
  • Build – creating innovation
  • Sustain – strengthening foundations

During the conference I co-presented a presentation with Julie Pettett, the CEO Of Volunteering Western Victoria. Putting Research into Practice – the Marketing and Rebranding of Wimmera Volunteers. The presentation discussed the importance of marketing and the experiences of Volunteering Western Victoria in re-engaging with its communities.

Volunteering Western Victoria, was formerly known as Wimmera Volunteers and had remained a static organisation, despite the changing nature of volunteering. There was a need to re-engage the community and to broaden its presence outside of Horsham in Western Victoria.

Alex co-presented with Julie Pettett the CEO of Volunteering Western Victoria

Alex co-presented with Julie Pettett the CEO of Volunteering Western Victoria

Syneka Marketing assisted Volunteering Western Victoria by developing a marketing plan that identified a future direction for the organisation. The marketing plan identified four goals supported in the businesses plan:

  • Be an effective peak organisation
  • Grow access to resources
  • Build capacity in the volunteer and community sector
  • Organisation development

These goals were supported by two further priorities identified in the marketing plan:

  • Diversify and Sustain Funding Support
  • Rebrand Wimmera Volunteers

A business plan identifies what an organisation wants to achieve and a marketing plan looks how to achieve this vision.  A marketing plan then considers the key messages and marketing tools that can reach the required stakeholders.

Diversifying income became a priority, due to the need to decrease dependence on government revenue.  The marketing plan identified business partnerships, the introduction of membership, fundraising and philanthropic programs that could add new income sources. These strategies supported the business plan, with membership complementing the desire to be a peak organisation and partnerships, enabling the development of new programs.

The rebranding of Wimmera Volunteers arose due to the need to position the organisation as a peak body and to re-engage with its community.  A new name, visual identity, logo and marketing materials were developed in six weeks, to launch the new brand at the 2012 Annual General Meeting.

Volunteering Western Victoria

Volunteering Western Victoria

The name Volunteering Western Victoria was selected, since it clearly defined the purpose of the organisation and the role it has in supporting volunteering across Western Victoria.  The tagline  Empowering Communities, Supporting Volunteers, reinforced the impact that the organisation has a local and individual level.

Not-for-profit organisations have limited marketing budgets and a result names should be clearly identifiable to avoid the need to explain the purpose of the organisation.

The new visual identity and brand for Volunteering Western Victoria

The new visual identity and brand for Volunteering Western Victoria

Marketing within not-for-profit organisations requires the ability to reach numerous stakeholders. There is a need for marketing messages that provide a consistent narrative, while being tailored to the needs of individual stakeholders. A not-for-profit organisation needs to not only reach its clients, but also government, business partners, volunteers, other organisations, board members and internal staff.

The aim of the rebrand was to utilise the new name and tagline, as well as modernising the image of the organisation. The rebranding was accompanied by the design of new marketing materials, including brochures, factsheets, posters and website.

The presentation was extremely well received and I would like to thank the many attendees for their interest in the journey undertaken by Volunteering Western Victoria.

Alex and Julie answering questions during the presentation

Alex and Julie answering questions during the presentation

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