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audiences Archives - Syneka Marketing

Visit Brisbane ad

Is it Visit Brisbane or Visit Melbourne?

By | Government | No Comments

As a strategic marketing agency it is our role to assist clients in determining their unique value proposition, which in turn informs their target markets and marketing mix. Over the break I encountered this billboard at Southern Cross Station:

 

At first, I thought that it was perhaps an advertisement for a restaurant at South Warf, given it is approximately 1 kilometre from Southern Cross Station and has almost the exact same look and feel as this advertisement.

On closer inspection, I realised that this was not an advertisement for South Warf, but for Brisbane.

Visit Brisbane ad

Visit Brisbane ad

Brisbane, unlike other areas in Queensland, is the urban centre, with a population of 2.3 million. It doesn’t have the glitzy beaches and hotels like the Gold Coast or the pristine scenery of the Whitsunday’s; and in many ways it is a lot like Melbourne.

Brisbane Marketing is the official tourism organisation for Brisbane, with one of its goals to increase interstate tourism from Melbourne. Unfortunately, this campaign has not understood this target audience.

South Warf Melbourne

South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

Riverside dining at South Warf Melbourne

There is no point creating a tourism campaign that looks like it was shot in Melbourne and then sold to people in Melbourne, when they can get the same experience walking 12 minutes from Southern Cross Station.

Tourism exists to generate a return, and while this campaign goes beyond the typical flora and fauna approach it does not look at how to position Brisbane’s strengths relative to Melbourne.

We encourage Brisbane Marketing to look strategically at their target audiences and start creating campaigns that these audiences with value.

Measuring Marketing Performance – Don’t confuse inputs for outputs

By | Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Last time we explored the customer journey, returning to the decision making process, as a potential customer begins at a pre-purchase phase prior to a purchase and then post-purchase considerations. We also explored the customer experience, to ensure that the term returns to its core definition within the marketing mix.

Both of these concepts demonstrate the need for consistency, as well as multiple contact points to reach customers and influence decisions. As a result, there is a need for a holistic view of marketing, since running disparate tactics will result in diminished outcomes. Furthermore, undertaking a holistic approach enables a greater degree of confidence in decisions and the ability to measure overall impact.

Unfortunately there is a lot of misinformation in regard to the measurement of marketing performance. Firstly, offline content, such as product factsheets, print media, radio and TV can be measured and should be evaluated to understand overall performance. Secondly, many digital metrics, such as website visitations, social media interaction are in fact inputs rather than outputs.

Far too often, we see marketing managers that report on website visitations, Facebook likes or Twitter followers, without providing metrics that consider the end outcomes, namely conversions into customers or repeat purchases. The key is to use these inputs and map the contact points that are required across the customer journey to achieve the end result, such as a purchase or repeat purchase. Similarly, the customer will have differing forms of interaction with a business, beyond promotions, such as a direct interaction with staff, or a visitation into a store. Each of these aspects form part of the journey and need to be measured, as an adverse experience across any of these areas can deter purchase intent.

Begin by assessing the channels that you use to raise overall awareness and then consider the next steps that a customer takes once there is general awareness. Is your prospective customer visiting a website and then following up through email or phone, or do they undertake further research, prior to returning? Is the first point of contact a broadcast medium or referral, rather than a website?

Pre purchase purchase post purchase

Each of these components form an input into the end goal, so consider overall reach, followed by identifying customers that have taken a subsequent step along the next contact point. Benchmark and evaluate these results so you can make informed decisions on the rate of marketing return and the effects of any modifications. As a result you can identify the relevancy of website visitors, whether event participation is reaching the target audiences and overall number of contact points and timing required to achieve purchase intent.

Marketing – Your short-term action need to strengthen your long-term position

By | News | No Comments

As a strategic marketing agency we work with our clients to align their business goals with marketing outcomes. The end result is a combination of short-term actions that can be implemented immediately and activities that build the capacity of a business over the longer-term. Like personal goals, business goals can take time, perseverance, strategy and dedication to accomplish.

Unfortunately in today’s fast paced environment it can be far too easy to rush into ill-considered short-term actions, which can have a detrimental impact on growth over the longer term. Aggressive pricing discounts are one of the most evident examples of this approach, whereby a short-term spike in sales, will often jeopardise the value proposition over the longer term.  Pricing is one element of the marketing mix and needs to be considered in tandem with all aspects of your business.

A tactics led approach can perpetuate business uncertainty, given that there is little consideration on the overall impact of a business. As a consequence, the wrong metrics are often collated, providing numbers that appear positive, but have little value. Classic examples include website visitations, when the more important metric is conversion and measuring the desire to purchase.

Furthermore, marketing activities do not work in isolation, and there is a need to measure the effectiveness of several activities across the entire decision making process. The evaluation of your marketing activities need to not only look at the performance of each tactic, but also their collective impact.

Unfortunately, it can often be difficult for business owners to view their business objectively, leading to poor judgement around strategic marketing decisions. Marketers need to demonstrate strategic expertise to ensure that all activities are assessed objectively and in the context of business goals.

The lack of objectivity is often evidenced in the rush for the latest trend, where the buzz blurs the metrics that actually matter. Content is the current example, whereby content for contents sake achieves little, but a targeted approach aimed at connecting and engaging target audiences, can have merit.  Social media was previously caught in a similar buzz, with metrics highlighting Facebook likes, but with little consideration on the need to convert these likes into advocates and customers.

A strategic approach looks beyond the buzz and begins by viewing a business holistically. There is a focus on relevant metrics, so that a business is able to measure outcomes and adjust to changing needs as required. As result, marketing activities focus on overall impact, ensuring a consistent experience that motivates purchase decisions.

Importantly there are often compounding benefits to a strategic approach, with short-term initiatives strengthening over time and reinforcing the value proposition of a business.

Business success is never going to be achieved by looking at discrete short-term actions, or rushing to the latest buzzwords.  Focus on your longer-term aspirations and begin by exploring initiatives that can be achieved in short-term while being consistent with your business goals.

Swinburne University

Australian Marketing Institute and Swinburne TAFE bringing industry to the classroom

By | News | One Comment

This afternoon I was invited to attend a mock trade show created for Swinburne TAFE students studying Certificate IV in Marketing and a Certificate IV in Business. The expo was created to enable students to develop the marketing strategies for an innovative product that could be sold in the real world.

Alex awarding a prize to a student

Alex awarding a prize to a student

I was the keynote speaker at the event and highlighted the skills that emerging marketers need to gain employment within the marketing profession. The expo enabled students to showcase their marketing knowledge including the need to look beyond pricing points and into the positioning of their products and the audiences they are seeking to attract.

Alex Makin at the expo

Alex Makin at the expo

Several prizes were awarded to the students. Congratulations to Swinburne and its students for developing an innovative approach that showcases marketing capabilities.

Advice on Delivering Effective Presentations

By | Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, Presentations, Resources | No Comments

Delivering presentations, whether through workshops or as keynote addresses, is an essential activity at Syneka Marketing. Most roles across business, not-for-profit organisations and government will involve some form of presentation delivery.

Delivering effective presentations allows you to convey your key messages.

Delivering effective presentations allows you to convey your key messages.

We thought it would be useful to discuss some steps we follow when delivering presentations:

  1. What is the topic? Know what you will be discussing and the reasons for the presentation. Ensure that you have identified the key points you wish to convey.
  2. Work to the duration. The length of your presentation will determine the depth and breadth of your content. Make sure you speak to the time that is allocated.
  3. What is the presentation format? Are you delivering a formal presentation, or is the format designed to be interactive? Often this will also depend on the number of attendees, given that larger audiences often require more formalised content.
  4. Know the speaking session. For example, if you are you one of several speakers, you need to maintain audience interest during the session. If you are delivering a stand alone presentation, then ensure you are able to promote the key outcomes you want to deliver.
  5. Know your audience. Who is attending and why? What outcomes are the attendees expecting, and how you can deliver on these expectations?
  6. Are presentation aides required? If so, make sure that the equipment such as whiteboards, projectors and computers, are available. Always have a backup, equipment can fail and you will need to be prepared with an alternative.
  7. Be clear on the outcomes. Understand the aims of your presentation and what you want to achieve. Ensure that your content is consistent with the outcomes you are seeking to achieve.
  8. Be prepared. Know what you want to say and be able to say it with confidence. You will not need to remember every single word of your presentation, but do ensure that you remember your key points.

Being able to deliver presentations can require practice, so ensure you are prepared. Your content should provide a consistent structure that introduces your topic, expands the content and demonstrates the key outcomes you want to achieve.

Our YouTube Premiere – We Discuss ‘What Is Marketing?’

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Resources | No Comments

At Syneka Marketing we know social media. To showcase how social media can help your business or organisation, we have started a YouTube channel.

We believe that YouTube has significant possibilities in enabling businesses to directly connect with communities and potential clients.

Globally, YouTube is the third most viewed website in the world, after Google and Facebook. Over four billion videos are viewed every day using this platform.

As a marketing agency we thought that we should start with the basics and explore the fundamentals through, What is Marketing?

Marketing is a concept that is often misinterpreted. The basis of good marketing begins with a strategy that enables you to achieve your goals. Marketing is more than sales, direct marketing, graphic design and website development; it is about providing a holistic approach that addresses your needs.

We wanted to produce a video that was of high quality and informative. We want to educate our audiences on marketing and the tools that are available. We thought that the best way to implement this vision, was to work with a professional film crew  to achieve our vision.

Being in front of the camera was quite an interesting experience. Alex and I are used to speaking in front of audiences, but talking directly to a camera is quite a different experience. For example, speaking to a camera doesn’t provide the same interaction that you gain when you are in front of an audience during a conference or workshop.

We hope that our YouTube presence will complement our work as an agency and raise the level of discussion in regard to marketing.