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Twentieth Man Fund Fundraising Breakfast with Russel Howcroft

By | Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | No Comments

The 20th Man Fund exists to alleviate poverty and to provide positive opportunities for disconnected youth. Since its beginnings in Melbourne’s Western suburbs, the Fund has grown to provide services across Melbourne and Victoria.

The 20th Man Fund was created by youth worker Les Twentyman, who through his career, saw firsthand the effects of disconnection and isolation within young people.  Over twenty years later the 20th Man Fund has grown to provide a range of services, including crisis accommodation, support services and leadership development.

20th Man Foundation Breakfast

20th Man Foundation Breakfast

This morning we attended a fundraising breakfast, which featured former advertising executive Russel Howcroft. While Russel is known for his appearance as a panelist on the Gruen Transfer, the breakfast provided an opportunity to learn more about his life prior to his career in advertising. Russel discussed his childhood and work history, which then developed into a passion for advertising and his subsequent involvement at Channel 10.

The 20th Man Fund is an example of a not-for-profit organisation that is dedicated to its mission in creating opportunities for young people. For further information please visit www.20thman.com.au

The co-dependence between Marketing and IT

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities | 2 Comments

Marketing and Information Technology are often seen as disparate functions with little overlap. In reality, however, both are required for any organisation or business to operate successfully. As a result there is an increasing co-dependence between both of these areas.

Marketing requires valid information so you can make the right assumptions and create strategies that deliver positive results. IT, through websites, customer relationship management (CRM) systems and point of sale data collection, provides the ability to capture data and to analyse this information to deliver insights.

As an example, websites have traditionally been seen as an IT exercise, with little consideration of usability and end user interaction. Undertaking this approach, means that your website will not take into consideration the needs of your target customers and will diminish the ability to achieve sales or inquiries.

A marketing approach, utilities available technology to deliver outcomes that support the goals and direction of your business. Through a marketing approach, a website would be developed from understanding the needs it would fulfill, including an an assessment of your target customers and how they interact with your business. The website appearance and functionality would support this interaction, so that it can guide visitors to achieve the goals you have for your site. Furthermore, a marketing approach would ensure that your website adapts the existing style and identity you have for your business, to ensure a consistent appearance and level of interaction.

Similarly, CRM systems help maintain contact with customers and store relevant information about them, your products and transaction history. While the storage of information is an IT exercise, marketing involves the use of this information to deliver insights that will achieve your business objectives. A marketing perspective would utilize this data to identify customers that require more frequent contact, or may be suitable for additional purchases.

If you do not have a CRM, then you would have the challenge of collating information and storing data in a centralized location. This results in inefficiency and makes it harder to analyse data to gain insights, such as frequency, variations between customers and even basic contact details.

For many businesses, marketing and information technology is not a core focus. Investing in marketing and information technology enables you to scale your business and to build capacity to facilitate growth.

The collaboration between marketing and information technology is only going to increase into the future. It is important to have the right systems in place to support your marketing initiatives.

Branding is more than just a logo

By | News | No Comments

Last week we looked at the definition of marketing. One of the major causes of confusion is the word branding, which is often a term that is confused for marketing.

A brand provides a physical identity for your business or a product or service, and while it is an element of marketing, it is not marketing in itself. A brand will often encompass elements, such as a logo and tagline, but should also consider the tone of content, supporting colours and overall appearance.

Marketing is the process that identifies whether your brand is relevant to your target market, adequately represents what you do and is able to differentiate yourself from competitors. A logo, or brand, that is created in isolation, is not going to provide you with traction.

If your logo fails to connect with your target market and does not reinforce the overall narrative of your business, then it will fail to provide a return.

Marketing is the thought behind a brand. This is why a marketing plan considers your products and services, analyses your competitors and identifies potential target markets.

A logo and brand is a physical representation of the marketing planning that has been considered for your business. A marketing plan enables you to understand the context, so you have a brand that is right for your business and reaches the demographics you want to target.

Branding is about aiming for the target

Branding is about aiming for the target

At Syneka Marketing we are passionate about defining marketing, to ensure that businesses avoid the hit or miss approach when considering how to reach target markets and promote their products and services. Our eBook What is Marketing? is a complimentary download and discusses the role of marketing in further detail.

Let’s give marketing a definition

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses, Advice for Not-for-profit Organisations and Charities, Government, News, Presentations | No Comments

As we’ve discussed previously, one of the fundamental challenges with marketing is the lack of definition. There is a need to define marketing so it can provide a clearly articulated role within businesses and not-for-profit organisations.

Unfortunately the term marketing has been hijacked by service providers that do not provide a holistic approach. Individual components, like graphic design, logos, social media, telesales and websites do not deliver marketing.

These are individual elements that can become a form of marketing, if there is a strategic plan that integrates key messages, appearance and calls to action.

Neglecting to develop a strategic marketing plan will result in a hit or miss approach with marketing. While, some of it may work, there will be diminished outcomes, due to the lack of a cohesive approach.

We’re aiming to redefine marketing so its strategic merits are understood and appreciated. This is why we’ve introducing a series of eBooks, with our first topic exploring the definition and role of marketing.

What is Marketing?‘ explores the elements of marketing and discusses how these combine into a cohesive strategy. The eBook includes worksheet based questions to develop a practical application of the key concepts.

We are offering ‘What is Marketing?‘ as a free resource to help guide the discussion and definition of marketing, and prevent the hit and miss approach that we see far too often in businesses and not-for-profit organisations.

We will be releasing further eBooks identifying specific areas of marketing, that we believe need clarification and support. We are happy to take your suggestions on topic you would like covered. Email us at alex@synekamarketing.com.au and let us know your thoughts.

‘What is Marketing?’ is a free eBook available for downloading from our eBook Portal.

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Delivering Sales in Business

Five Questions Every Prospect Will Ask (Themselves)

By | Advice, Advice for Businesses | No Comments

Whenever confronted with somebody who wants to sell them something, prospects ask five questions, in this order.

If the answer to all of them is not a resounding “yes,” a sale is not going to take place.

1. Do I want to do business with this person? Do I trust them?

Within two minutes after you meet a prospective customer, that person has probably decided whether they are willing to buy from you. That’s why first impressions, your appearance and building rapport are so important. Also, have you done your homework and researched this person’s company?

2. Do I want to do business with the firm this person represents?

There are two possible scenarios.

If the person is not yet familiar with your firm, it’s up to you to position it in a positive manner. If the customer is familiar with your firm, then you’ve either got a good reputation, a bad reputation (you’ve got to start with damage control) or a mediocre reputation–in which case, you’re back to positioning your firm to give the prospect a positive impression.

3. Do I want and need what this person is selling?

Through the conversation with the customer, you will discover needs (and requirements) that match your offering. The biggest mistake at this stage is breaking into the ‘sales pitch’. Remember: “Customers like to buy, but they hate being sold.”

4. Does the price and value meet my expectations?

The person has recognized the need, but is assessing whether or not what you’re selling is affordable–and, if affordable, worth the money. This entails weighing that need against the other demands that are vying for their attention and money. The customer may want (or have) competitive information that is competitive. Now is the time to stress value and benefits and diminish price and competition.

5. Is this the right time to buy?

A prospect can be completely ready to buy and yet still feel that it’s not the right time. They may believe that holding out will result in a discount, or they simply are not in a hurry to decide. What can you do, when gaining positive responses from one to four above, to move to the commitment stage?